The Monte Carlo Story

  • 1956
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Comedy, Drama

This is Dietrich's only Italian-made movie and, unfortunately, the camera dwells too long on the Italian topography and not long enough on Dietrich. Cinematographer Rotunno was the man who lensed THE BIBLE and he was far better at that kind of grandeur then at filming a fabulous face. De Sica is an Italian count who has fallen on hard times by squandering...read more

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This is Dietrich's only Italian-made movie and, unfortunately, the camera dwells too long on the Italian topography and not long enough on Dietrich. Cinematographer Rotunno was the man who lensed THE BIBLE and he was far better at that kind of grandeur then at filming a fabulous face. De

Sica is an Italian count who has fallen on hard times by squandering his once-formidable fortune at the gaming tables. He meets Dietrich in Monte Carlo and immediately falls for her, thinking she's a wealthy marquise. However, she also suffers from a gambling addiction and has thrown her fortune

away. Their romance founders when each learns the other is broke, and Dietrich takes up with O'Connell, a wealthy American widower with a teenage daughter, Trundy. Trundy has eyes for De Sica, but he spurns her, noting that he is old enough to be her father. Dietrich and O'Connell make plans to

wed, but in the meantime De Sica gets hot at the roulette table. After he amasses a huge sum, he goes cold and starts to lose it all, but is knocked out by his former chauffeur, Tulli, before he can lose everything. De Sica wakes up, pays off his creditors, and takes an oath never to gamble again.

He is about to set sail for Naples, and Dietrich, who is living aboard O'Connell's yacht in preparation for their marriage, can't bear the thought of losing De Sica. She tells O'Connell she loves De Sica, then joins the count as he sails away. This is about as contrived a plot as one can find and

the result is generally disappointing. Dietrich plays the role as though she were sleepwalking and one wonders why she took it in the first place. De Sica reeks of continental charm but both of their underlying character traits never allow them to be lovable. It is not easy to sympathize with

people who are so selfish and self-destructive and whose intentions, until the end of the movie, are so greed-oriented. Much of the cast was made up of actual employees of Monte Carlo casinos. Trundy later married press agent-turned-producer Arthur Jacobs (DR. DOLITTLE, PLANET OF THE APES, etc.)

and paid less attention to her acting career.

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: This is Dietrich's only Italian-made movie and, unfortunately, the camera dwells too long on the Italian topography and not long enough on Dietrich. Cinematographer Rotunno was the man who lensed THE BIBLE and he was far better at that kind of grandeur the… (more)

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