The Man Who Broke The Bank At Monte Carlo

  • 1935
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Comedy

This was the shortest film and the longest title for Colman, and, although the idea has great possibilities, most of them were flubbed by the people behind the scenes. It's just after WW I and the Russian Revolution, and Colman, an expatriate White Russian prince, has been forced to take a job driving a cab in order to buy his blinis. He is one of several...read more

Where to Watch

Available to Stream

  • Watch on
Rating:

This was the shortest film and the longest title for Colman, and, although the idea has great possibilities, most of them were flubbed by the people behind the scenes. It's just after WW I and the Russian Revolution, and Colman, an expatriate White Russian prince, has been forced to take a

job driving a cab in order to buy his blinis. He is one of several emigres who now live in Paris and talk of nothing but the good old days when the Czar reigned supreme. After he demonstrates a silly gambling "system," a bunch of his old Russian pals give him enough money to try his luck at the

gaming tables of the famed Monaco casino. He proceeds to win millions of francs after an incredible run of luck at that most expensive of all games, baccarat. He returns to Paris, pays off the investors in his scheme, and goes to Switzerland for a well-earned vacation. He has given interviews

telling the press that the average bettor should be wary about attempting the same ploy because, in the end, the casino, by dint of its house percentage, will always win. The management of the casino wants to get back whatever they money they can, so they hire Bennett and her brother Clive to lure

Colman back to the tables. While on holiday in Yodel-land, Bennett falls for the romantic Colman, who is soon back at Monte Carlo where he loses everything he's won. Bennett feels awful about what she's done and tears up her paycheck, then tries to find Colman. In Paris, Colman sees Bennett

working at a cabaret, borrows money to rent some evening duds, goes in to see her, rejects her, and leaves. Bennett races after him to learn that he is a mere cab driver, a fact that will make it much easier for her to wind up with him. In the final scene, Colman is again seated at the "Russian

Table" of his favorite cafe and holding court. This picture may have been one of the first to have derived its heritage from a song, "I'm the Man Who Broke the Bank at Monte Carlo," which was a hit many years before the movie. Bruce does a good comic turn as Colman's pal and masquerading valet.

The movie was the first joint venture between the newly merged companies of Twentieth Century and Fox.

Cast & Details See all »

  • Rating: NR
  • Review: This was the shortest film and the longest title for Colman, and, although the idea has great possibilities, most of them were flubbed by the people behind the scenes. It's just after WW I and the Russian Revolution, and Colman, an expatriate White Russian… (more)

Show More »