The Loves Of Carmen

  • 1948
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Drama

Prosper Merimee's heroine, Carmen, is one of the most durable ladies ever created. Bizet first adapted the story as an opera that was introduced in 1875. The Edison company's film version was done in 1904, the first in an apparently endless series of film versions. Marguerite Snow, Marion Leonard, and Pearl Sindelar all played the role in 1913, then Cecil...read more

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Prosper Merimee's heroine, Carmen, is one of the most durable ladies ever created. Bizet first adapted the story as an opera that was introduced in 1875. The Edison company's film version was done in 1904, the first in an apparently endless series of film versions. Marguerite Snow, Marion

Leonard, and Pearl Sindelar all played the role in 1913, then Cecil B. DeMille starred Geraldine Farrar in his depiction in 1915, while William Fox used Theda Bara that same year, and Charles Chaplin spoofed it the next. Then the cigarette girl got a rest until Ernst Lubitsch directed Pola Negri

in 1921. In 1927, Dolores Del Rio was tapped and, in 1928, the French did a version with Raquel Meller. 1931 marked her first talking picture as Marguerite Namara essayed the role in England. In 1933, the Germans made a funny version with Lotte Reiniger, then the Mexicans did it their way in 1940

with Imperio Argentina in the lead. Viviane Romance starred in the 1947 Italian-made picture and this one followed. But there were others to come. CARMEN JONES, an all-black picture, was released in 1954 and even more followed, including a Spanish version in the 1980s. This time out Carmen is

played by Hayworth. An amoral creature married to gypsy Jory, she's had a series of lovers, many run-ins with the law, and a host of robberies to her discredit. A fortune teller predicts that Hayworth will die at the hands of her great love. This comes true as Ford, playing Don Jose as though he

were a Kansas cowboy, stabs Hayworth after first dispatching Jory in a knife fight. Ford had been legitimate until he battled with Moss in a sword clash. When Moss was killed, Ford became a criminal, and his downfall is assured when he encounters Hayworth. The central California town of Lone Pine

was location headquarters for the movie, much of which was also shot in the area of Mt. Whitney. Lone Pine was doubled for many European locations and was a favorite of filmmakers in the 1930s. Although Vidor gets producer credit, it was actually produced by Hayworth's company, Beckworth. The

assistant director was Earl Bellamy, who became a successful TV director in later years with "The Waltons" and many other shows. This film, unfortunately, shed no new light on Carmen but did make scads of money and showed everyone that Hayworth was not just another pretty set of legs. One

forgettable song: "The Love of a Gypsy" (M.W. Stoloff, Fred Karger).

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: Prosper Merimee's heroine, Carmen, is one of the most durable ladies ever created. Bizet first adapted the story as an opera that was introduced in 1875. The Edison company's film version was done in 1904, the first in an apparently endless series of film… (more)

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