The Little Fugitive

  • 1953
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Drama

This honest, independently produced slice of Americana was barely noticed at the time of its release. The almost neo-realistic film portrays Joey (Andrusco), a seven-year-old Brooklyn boy, and his older brother, Lennie (Ricky Brewster), who gets stuck babysitting when a family emergency forces their mother to leave the boys alone overnight. In order to weasel...read more

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This honest, independently produced slice of Americana was barely noticed at the time of its release. The almost neo-realistic film portrays Joey (Andrusco), a seven-year-old Brooklyn boy, and his older brother, Lennie (Ricky Brewster), who gets stuck babysitting when a family emergency forces their mother to leave the boys alone overnight. In order to weasel out of his responsibility, Lennie and his friends con Joey into thinking he's killed Lennie with the gun one of the boys has "borrowed" from his dad. Being a staunch cowboy movie fan, Joey believes he has indeed committed a murder, and runs away. He takes refuge at Coney Island, forgetting his guilt long enough to enjoy the rides, games, and animals. He remains absorbed in this fantasy until a suspicious pony-ride operator takes notice and calls Joey's home. Andrusco, as natural as can be, turns in one of the most unprecocious child performances in film, a far cry from the usual studio "brats." Produced on a shoestring by three former journalists and still photographers, THE LITTLE FUGITIVE stood beside the films of Mizoguchi, Fellini, Huston, and Carne to receive a Silver Lion from the Venice Film Festival. Except for a single Oscar nomination--for Best Story--it unfortunately was soon forgotten in its home country and today is hardly remembered. Once seen, however, it will never be forgotten.

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: This honest, independently produced slice of Americana was barely noticed at the time of its release. The almost neo-realistic film portrays Joey (Andrusco), a seven-year-old Brooklyn boy, and his older brother, Lennie (Ricky Brewster), who gets stuck baby… (more)

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