The Last Angry Man

  • 1959
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Drama

Though the direction of this sensitive film sometimes lags, the powerful performance by Muni makes the movie exceptional. He is a rugged individualist, an idealistic physician who has worked at his clinic in a Brooklyn slum for 45 years with his faithful wife, Pollock, at his side. Muni's nephew, Baker, a young journalist, writes an article about his dedicated...read more

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Though the direction of this sensitive film sometimes lags, the powerful performance by Muni makes the movie exceptional. He is a rugged individualist, an idealistic physician who has worked at his clinic in a Brooklyn slum for 45 years with his faithful wife, Pollock, at his side. Muni's

nephew, Baker, a young journalist, writes an article about his dedicated uncle, and it attracts the attention of TV producer Wayne who, at the urging of the ambitious nephew looking for a job on a TV production, decides he will do a show on Muni. But the doctor wants no part of a network show, so

Wayne turns to Adler, who went to school with Muni, asking him to persuade the old man to cooperate. Adler agrees, but on condition that Wayne promises to buy Muni and his wife a nice home in a decent neighborhood. Adler then persuades Muni into appearing on the show in order to express his

beliefs about the rampant hypocrisy in the medical profession. Williams, a black street tough in Muni's neighborhood, has meanwhile become Muni's latest cause; the doctor believes that Williams is suffering from a brain tumor and is forever tracking him down to administer aid. On the night of the

show, Muni hears that Williams has been arrested for car theft, and he leaves before the telecast, suffering a lethal heart attack while in the police station on his errand of mercy. Muni is riveting as the elderly idealist whose life is devoted to medicine, and strong support comes from the

veteran Adler and from Williams, making his film debut here. This was Muni's last film, and he consented to appear in it only on the condition that he would have his way. To that end, he lectured director Mann for hours on how to interpret a scene. Originally, Columbia had thought to cast Peter

Ustinov in the physician's role, but studio chief Harry Cohn felt he would not be strong enough, so the temperamental, mercurial Muni was slated. Muni received his fifth Oscar nomination for his telling portrait (he lost to Charleton Heston for BEN-HUR), and the film was also nominated for Best

Art Direction.

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: Though the direction of this sensitive film sometimes lags, the powerful performance by Muni makes the movie exceptional. He is a rugged individualist, an idealistic physician who has worked at his clinic in a Brooklyn slum for 45 years with his faithful w… (more)

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