The Interview

  • 2000
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Crime, Thriller

What are we to make of down-at-the-heel Eddie Fleming (Hugo Weaving), whom we first see dozing in an apartment that stinks of poverty? The police kick down his door, stick guns in his face, cuff him, push him around and haul him down to the station, all without telling him what they want or why they're picking on him. Is he a poor schmuck, the innocent...read more

Where to Watch

Available to Stream

  • Watch on
Reviewed by Maitland McDonagh
Rating:

What are we to make of down-at-the-heel Eddie Fleming (Hugo Weaving), whom we first see dozing in an apartment that stinks of poverty? The police kick down his door, stick guns in his face, cuff him, push him around and haul him down to the station, all

without telling him what they want or why they're picking on him. Is he a poor schmuck, the innocent victim of police brutality? Or is he something more sinister? That's the first question posed by this psychological thriller, which takes place almost entirely in the interrogation room of a shabby

Melbourne police station. Fleming's chief interrogator is Det. Sgt. John Steele (Tony Martin), a stocky pit bull of a man who, we gradually learn, has been brought in to goose a moribund investigation into the disappearance of one Arthur Beecroft, who vanished while driving along an isolated strip

of country road. Steele's partner is Wayne Prior (Aaron Jeffery), a younger cop who's already picked up such bad habits as bullying and intimidating suspects; the two of them appear to be playing bad cop/really bad cop with Fleming. From the first, you know there's more to this than the

stolen car Steele starts off asking about; no one kicks in a man's door at 5 am for a stolen car. But 'how much more?' is the question that drives the plot. This Australian psychological thriller — the feature film debut of writer/director Craig Monahan — is equal parts THE USUAL

SUSPECTS and Kafka's The Trial, and for a movie that's 95% talk it works up a pretty powerful head of dramatic steam. Sure, the verbal parrying between Weaving and Martin is a genre staple, but Monahan moves it front and center and lets his actors loose. The ensuing cat-and-mouse game is

truly chilling, right to the ambiguous end.

Cast & Details See all »

  • Released: 2000
  • Rating: NR
  • Review: What are we to make of down-at-the-heel Eddie Fleming (Hugo Weaving), whom we first see dozing in an apartment that stinks of poverty? The police kick down his door, stick guns in his face, cuff him, push him around and haul him down to the station, all w… (more)

Show More »