The Human Tornado

  • 1976
  • Movie
  • R
  • Action, Comedy

"As sure as my name is Dolemite, I shall return." Those were the last words in Rudy Ray Moore's mind-numbing first movie, and he made good on the promise in this even more eccentric and amusing no-budget action-comedy. Queen Bee (Lady Reed) is forced to close down her nightclub and bring her girls to work for her rival, the mobster Cavaletti (Herb Graham)....read more

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"As sure as my name is Dolemite, I shall return." Those were the last words in Rudy Ray Moore's mind-numbing first movie, and he made good on the promise in this even more eccentric and amusing no-budget action-comedy.

Queen Bee (Lady Reed) is forced to close down her nightclub and bring her girls to work for her rival, the mobster Cavaletti (Herb Graham). Dolemite (Rudy Ray Moore), while dodging a hillbilly sheriff whose wife he bedded, sleeps with Cavaletti's nymphomaniac wife. He gets her to tell where

Cavaletti is keeping a pair of Queen Bee's girls who were kidnapped as collateral. At Cavaletti's hideaway, Dolemite clobbers the guards and rescues the girls from a cobwebbed torture chamber.

Meanwhile, Queen Bee and her girls are at Cavaletti's birthday party. They let in some of Dolemite's men, and together they wreak havoc. The cops arrive; Cavaletti flees into Dolemite's clutches. Dolemite brings him back to the torture chamber and has rats chew off his genitals. The cops arrive

again. Dolemite runs. The sheriff catches and shoots him, then drives away. Dolemite sits up, unbuttons his bulletproof vest, and laughs.

DOLEMITE (1975) was a fairly dull story notable for its miserable acting and filming, with comedy inserts and asides. In THE HUMAN TORNADO, the plot is not appreciably different (regain lost nightclub, fight gangsters), but the absurdity quotient is magnified immeasurably, and never once does the

film take itself seriously. From the opening moments, with an overweight, naked Moore running from the sheriff's gun (and literally stopping the film to marvel at a particular stunt, then running the film backward and replaying it), to the speeding car chases and kung fu fights (complete with

ridiculous noises parodying those made by Bruce Lee and his offspring), this is a film that just doesn't give a damn about rules (unlike its predecessor, which tried to play by them, but couldn t figure them out).

After two cars are blown up in the pre-credits sequence (the only real sign of an increased budget), we are treated to a tour of Los Angeles nightclubs, as Moore and his cronies (including "Ghostbuster" Ernie Hudson, billed as Louis Hudson) search for Queen Bee. Of course that's merely an excuse

to pad the film with footage of some of Moore's nightclub pals performing snippets of songs and a truly excruciating dance number. Once the film actually gets going, the most memorable moments are almost parenthetical to the plot: without warning the scene shifts to a fantasy by Cavaletti's

wife--whom we've never even seen before--in which black studs emerge from a toybox and pose naked (oddly enough for a blaxploitation movie, there is actually considerably more male nudity in the film than female); and Moore posing as a nerdy door-to-door salesman of sex paintings who proceeds to

literally bring down the roof of Mrs. Caveletti's bedroom when the two cavort in a bed that bounces around the room while doors shake and chandeliers explode. (Violence, extensive nudity, sexual situations, extreme profanity.)

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  • Released: 1976
  • Rating: R
  • Review: "As sure as my name is Dolemite, I shall return." Those were the last words in Rudy Ray Moore's mind-numbing first movie, and he made good on the promise in this even more eccentric and amusing no-budget action-comedy. Queen Bee (Lady Reed) is forced to c… (more)

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