The Hollow

  • 2003
  • Movie
  • R
  • Mystery

Tailored to showcase David Suchet's signature interpretation of Agatha Christie's fictional detective Hercule Poirot, this TV mystery pits the sleuth against the iffy "noblesse oblige" attitudes of English blue-bloods. Poor Poirot! Even at his weekend retreat, he can’t escape homicide — his snooty neighbors, Lady Lucy (Sarah Miles) and Sir Henry...read more

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Reviewed by Robert Pardi
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Tailored to showcase David Suchet's signature interpretation of Agatha Christie's fictional detective Hercule Poirot, this TV mystery pits the sleuth against the iffy "noblesse oblige" attitudes of English blue-bloods.

Poor Poirot! Even at his weekend retreat, he can’t escape homicide — his snooty neighbors, Lady Lucy (Sarah Miles) and Sir Henry Angkatell (Edward Hardwicke), think it would be ripping if he attended their dinner party. After a sumptuous meal, the guests play the Angkatells’ favorite diversion, the Murder Game. One guest, Gerda Christow (Claire Pace), is so distracted by keeping a watchful eye on her unfaithful husband, John (Jonathan Cake), that she has trouble focusing on social chatter. Gerda pretends to be oblivious when John's old flame, Veronica Carstairs (Lysette Anthony), lures him to her cottage, but the next morning another weekend visitor, Henrietta Savernake (Megan Dodds), spots a pistol-toting Gerda standing over John’s prone body. As Poirot and the others watch, Veronica deliberately tosses Gerda’s gun into the pool. With the crime scene frozen in his memory, an uneasy Poirot tackles a real-life version of the Murder Game: If mealy-mouthed Gerda is as innocent as she seems, who else had a motive to kill her unfaithful spouse? Lucy and her manservant, Gudgeon (Edward Fox), muddle matters further by admitting that both of them handling the alleged murder weapon. As the aristocrats lie through their teeth, Poirot concludes that the real weapon has been hidden elsewhere. While Veronica tries to mislead the Belgian sleuth, Poirot mentally revisits the staged crime Scene and concludes that seeing isn’t always believing, especially when the guilty are doing their best to manipulate your perspective.

One of a new batch of Poirot films, this crackerjack whodunit boasts a script by Nick Dear that allows the wily detective’s human side to emerge, and the exemplary cast flourishes under Simon Langton's beautifully modulated direction.

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  • Released: 2003
  • Rating: R
  • Review: Tailored to showcase David Suchet's signature interpretation of Agatha Christie's fictional detective Hercule Poirot, this TV mystery pits the sleuth against the iffy "noblesse oblige" attitudes of English blue-bloods. Poor Poirot! Even at his weekend r… (more)

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