The Great Divide

  • 1930
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Western

A remake of a 1925 silent film adaptation of writer Moody's popular play which melded the dancing-daughter, jazz-baby genre of the 1920s with the stock western. Keith, a fine stage actor, plays a well-to-do businessman who, garbed as a bandido after a Mexican fiesta, abducts Mackaill--British, but a one-time Ziegfeld girl--in order to sway her from her...read more

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A remake of a 1925 silent film adaptation of writer Moody's popular play which melded the dancing-daughter, jazz-baby genre of the 1920s with the stock western. Keith, a fine stage actor, plays a well-to-do businessman who, garbed as a bandido after a Mexican fiesta, abducts

Mackaill--British, but a one-time Ziegfeld girl--in order to sway her from her sluttish, profligate Roaring-Twenties life style. She is unaware that her captor is her late father's former business partner, the man who has been financially supporting that self-same life style. Keith carts Mackaill

to his isolated mountain cabin near the Mexican border, where she runs into a number of western stereotype characters including comic villain Hendricks Jr.--in a role well-played by Wallace Beery in the 1925 silent version--and fiery Mexican servant girl Loy. Loy, speaking in the standard ethnic

accent which served her so well in her customary Gypsy/Arab/Hispanic parts of the time, cavils at Keith's concupiscient captive; she begs to bed the brave buccaneer herself in a series of exotic Mexican dances. Keith, intent on imparting moral verities on wayward wanton Mackaill, spurns the

lascivious Latin. Mackaill's hatred of her late father's puritanical partner gradually changes to desire. Loy leaves and the abduction turns amorous. Oddly, First National released this picture in both sound and titled silent versions--despite the fact that sound films had been ascendant for more

than a year--apparently hoping to catch bookings in unconverted rural theaters. Songs include "The End of the Lonesome Trail" and "Si, Si, Senor."

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: A remake of a 1925 silent film adaptation of writer Moody's popular play which melded the dancing-daughter, jazz-baby genre of the 1920s with the stock western. Keith, a fine stage actor, plays a well-to-do businessman who, garbed as a bandido after a Mexi… (more)

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