The Girl From Missouri

  • 1934
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Comedy

Harlow, the daughter of an innkeeper in a small resort town, is annoyed at the fact that her stepfather wants her to "entertain" the clientele, in somewhat beyond the usual ways. With her best friend Patsy Kelly, she runs off to New York to find a better life. She gets a job as a chorine but nurtures the hope that she will eventually be able to marry the...read more

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Harlow, the daughter of an innkeeper in a small resort town, is annoyed at the fact that her stepfather wants her to "entertain" the clientele, in somewhat beyond the usual ways. With her best friend Patsy Kelly, she runs off to New York to find a better life. She gets a job as a chorine

but nurtures the hope that she will eventually be able to marry the millionaire of her dreams. Despite lots of double entendres, Harlow remains very virginal and will not give up her chastity. She is waiting until Mr. Right drives up in his Bentley and marries her. She gets a job performing at a

stag party along with several other chorus types, a party hosted by Stone who wants Barrymore, a very wealthy man, to advance him some money until he gets back on his feet. Barrymore, in one of his patented miserly roles, foregoes the pleasure of lending Stone any money, which causes Stone to take

his own life, but not before he gives Harlow his golden cufflinks because he is taken with her breezy personality. The cops enter and think that Harlow may have stolen the prized possessions from the dead man, but Barrymore confirms they were a present from the late ne'er-do-well. Harlow thinks

providence may have sent Barrymore her way as the man she will marry. He's rich, a widower, and apparently lonely. Harlow follows him to Florida where he lives aboard a yacht. Once there, she meets Barrymore's son, Tone, and falls in love with him. Tone likes her enough to propose that she become

his mistress, which throws Harlow into hysteria. She wants to be a wife, not a kept woman. Through her tears, she acquiesces to his request. Tone realizes that Harlow is truly a virtuous girl, however, and that she is willing to her virtue aside only because she really loves him. Once that gets

through his thick skull, he proposes marriage and she eagerly accepts. Barrymore, remembering how and where he met the platinum blonde, wants that romance put aside right away. No son of his is going to marry a cheap, tawdry chorus girl. In an attempt to prove to Tone that Harlow is just a gold

digger, Barrymore has her framed by hiring a man to go to her hotel room. Tone is despondent at what appears to be duplicity on his intended's part and refuses to believe that she is innocent. Hamilton, who is richer than Barrymore, pays Harlow's bail and gets her out of the false imprisonment, so

she agrees to become his mistress. But first, she is going to wreak some vengeance on Barrymore. He is about to leave for Europe to attend a conference. As he confers with a group of press cameramen, she arrives dressed only in a revealing slip, runs up to the old codger, gives him a squeeze, and

exits as fast as she entered. Tone by now has realized that she was innocent and wants to apologize. When Barrymore tells Tone what Harlow did, Tone represses a smile and knows she did it out of revenge. He accuses his father of framing Harlow, and Barrymore admits it. Next, the two men go out

looking for Harlow. They locate her at Hamilton's sumptuous apartment, still a virgin but slightly tipsy from celebration drinks. Tone and Harlow marry quickly, which also gets Barrymore off the hook when he explains to curious newshawks that Harlow is, in fact, his daughter-in-law and was only

being cute as she showed her affection for the old coot. Fade out with Tone and Harlow looking forward to a long and happy life together. Lots of funny lines, lots of raucous action--and the scene where Harlow arrives at the yacht in Florida is a riot. The picture was released in England as ONE

HUNDRED PERCENT PURE and had two titles before the final one: "Eadie Was A Lady," then "Born To Be Kissed." Sharp dialog from John Emerson and Anita Loos, who was also responsible for GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES, as well as at least fifty other screenplays.

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: Harlow, the daughter of an innkeeper in a small resort town, is annoyed at the fact that her stepfather wants her to "entertain" the clientele, in somewhat beyond the usual ways. With her best friend Patsy Kelly, she runs off to New York to find a better l… (more)

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