The Gilded Lily

  • 1935
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Comedy

A charming and often overlooked comedy, this was the first of a septet of pairings for Fred MacMurray and Claudette Colbert. She was already a major star (winning an Oscar the year before for IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT), and he was a 27-year-old newcomer, two years younger than she. The chemistry was instant. They had such a good time working together that they...read more

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A charming and often overlooked comedy, this was the first of a septet of pairings for Fred MacMurray and Claudette Colbert. She was already a major star (winning an Oscar the year before for IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT), and he was a 27-year-old newcomer, two years younger than she. The

chemistry was instant. They had such a good time working together that they were to become one of the best duos of the era. In this film, MacMurray is a New York news reporter and Colbert plays a stenographer. They meet on the subway and love spending their afternoons discussing such world-shaking

topics as the merits of peanuts versus popcorn for serious snacking at the movies. He is mad for her, but there is a touch of the gold digger in her personality, so her chapeau is set for Ray Milland, a rich and titled Englishman who is the son of C. Aubrey Smith. It looks as though she'll get her

wish and marry Milland, but they have an argument and she refuses his proposal of marriage. MacMurray is delighted and writes a newspaper story which makes her famous as "The No Girl," the one who said no to what every girl dreams of--marriage to a wealthy and handsome young man. Due to the

notoriety, she is booked in a nightclub as a singer, but her debut is a shambles in which she forgets the words to her song. She then redeems herself by ad-libbing some charming lines that convince the crowd she is a lovely person and not just the media freak she appears to be. She is reunited

with Milland in England and tries to live life the way he wants it lived, but she soon comes to the conclusion that she would be lots happier with MacMurray. This film is a good example of the 1930s screwball comedy, combining the sharp dialog of Claude Binyon in his first solo screenplay effort

with the smooth direction of Wesley Ruggles, brother of Charles. Two years after the movie was shot, MacMurray and Colbert did a version of it on the air for "Lux Radio Theatre," the show hosted for so many years by Cecil B. DeMille.

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: A charming and often overlooked comedy, this was the first of a septet of pairings for Fred MacMurray and Claudette Colbert. She was already a major star (winning an Oscar the year before for IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT), and he was a 27-year-old newcomer, two y… (more)

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