The Fly II

  • 1989
  • Movie
  • R
  • Horror, Science Fiction

Like the pair of sequels which sprang from the original THE FLY (1958), this sequel to David Cronenberg's masterful 1986 remake is uninspired, uninvolving, and wholly unnecessary. Directed by first-timer Chris Walas, the Oscar-winning special-effects whiz who created the various viscera for the 1986 remake, THE FLY II is merely an excuse to indulge in special-effects...read more

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Like the pair of sequels which sprang from the original THE FLY (1958), this sequel to David Cronenberg's masterful 1986 remake is uninspired, uninvolving, and wholly unnecessary. Directed by first-timer Chris Walas, the Oscar-winning special-effects whiz who created the various viscera

for the 1986 remake, THE FLY II is merely an excuse to indulge in special-effects while neglecting the narrative. A baby boy emerges from a larva, and is adopted by the sinister head of a mega-corporation, Anton Bartok (Lee Richardson). The child, Martin Brundle (Eric Stoltz), who is raised in the

corporation's research facility, looks normal but matures five times faster than ordinary kids. By the time he's five, Martin is involved in a major scientific project, has fallen in love with a research assistant (Daphne Zuniga), and has started to develop alarming fly-like characteristics.

Bartok plans to exploit this metamorphosis, but Martin rebels against the evil industrialist. Wholly derivative, the movie borrows its opening from IT'S ALIVE (1974), degenerates into ALIEN (1979), and then ends with a quote from the 1932 classic FREAKS, with nothing particularly creative or

interesting taking place in between. While effects hounds may be pleased with THE FLY II, anyone with any interest at all in story or character will come away disappointed.

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  • Released: 1989
  • Rating: R
  • Review: Like the pair of sequels which sprang from the original THE FLY (1958), this sequel to David Cronenberg's masterful 1986 remake is uninspired, uninvolving, and wholly unnecessary. Directed by first-timer Chris Walas, the Oscar-winning special-effects whiz… (more)

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