The Chain

  • 1984
  • Movie
  • PG
  • Comedy

The inevitable tribulations of moving day are brought to the screen in this funny British offering. The title comes from the sequence of upwardly mobile moves in Greater London, each hinging on the current tenants moving along, and each vignette taking as its theme one of the seven deadly sins. Norville moves out of his mother's house to set up housekeeping...read more

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The inevitable tribulations of moving day are brought to the screen in this funny British offering. The title comes from the sequence of upwardly mobile moves in Greater London, each hinging on the current tenants moving along, and each vignette taking as its theme one of the seven

deadly sins. Norville moves out of his mother's house to set up housekeeping with his girl friend in Tufnell Park. Out of that flat are moving Wolf and Lawson, a young married couple moving up to a flat in Willesden. That apartment is being vacated by Troughton and Logan, who are buying their

first house in Hammersmith, which is currently inhabited by the miserly Hawthorne and his wife, Massey. At the next link, Whitelaw is unwilling to move. Her husband is the one who sold the house, and now he's dead and she sees no reason to move from a perfectly comfortable house. Next in the

series is Parfitt and Rowe, about to move into the house of their dreams in a rich neighborhood. There McKern, a self-made millionaire, prepares to give it all up and move back to the neighborhood of his childhood, the same place where the film began. Over it all lurk the philosophical

observations of Mitchell and his team of movers. Some of the scripting is forced to make each story fit into the central conceit of the film, but McKern is always a pleasure to watch, and the cast is full of familiar faces who all do admirable turns.

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  • Released: 1984
  • Rating: PG
  • Review: The inevitable tribulations of moving day are brought to the screen in this funny British offering. The title comes from the sequence of upwardly mobile moves in Greater London, each hinging on the current tenants moving along, and each vignette taking as… (more)

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