The Broken Hearts Club: A Romantic Comedy

Even if you've resolved not to see another romantic comedy about the vipers' nest that is the gay singles scene, make an exception. Writer-director Greg Berlanti's debut feature is bright, breezy and full of deliciously quotable dialogue. The characters may still be stereotypes, but they're well-written stereotypes. The action centers around a West Hollywood...read more

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Reviewed by Ken Fox
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Even if you've resolved not to see another romantic comedy about the vipers' nest that is the gay singles scene, make an exception. Writer-director Greg Berlanti's debut feature is bright, breezy and full of deliciously quotable dialogue. The characters may

still be stereotypes, but they're well-written stereotypes. The action centers around a West Hollywood eatery owned and operated by Jack (John Mahoney), who each year convinces photographer Dennis (Timothy Olyphant) and his tight-knit group of friends to sign up for his softball team, the Broken

Hearts League. Dennis is turning 28 and has begun to suspect that empty conversation and emptier sex aren't really what he wants out of life, and his friends are in worse shape. Handsome aspiring actor Cole (Dean Cain) has a picture-perfect face and no qualms about dumping his current flame the

minute something better comes along; therapist-in-training Howie (Matt McGrath) can't let go of his ex (Justin Theroux); Benji (Zach Braff) gets mixed up with a "gym bunny" and serious drugs; Taylor (Billy Porter) has just been dumped by his long-time boyfriend via long-distance phone call; and

Patrick's (Ben Weber) average looks make him feel like Quasimodo in a city of Adonises. The very talented Olyphant (GO) is ostensibly the film's star, but it's truly an ensemble piece with its share of ensemble-piece problems. Each character has his own story line — Dennis falls out with Cole

over his treatment of a barely out "newbie" (Andrew Keegan); Patrick is pressured by his sister (Mary McCormack) and her girlfriend (Nia Long) to be a sperm donor — but it's difficult to bring the characters together in any way that doesn't feel contrived. No matter: The film is full of solid

comic performances and a surprising measure of wisdom, making this a highly entertaining — and highly relevant — guide to contemporary dating, gay or straight.

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  • Released: 2000
  • Rating: R
  • Review: Even if you've resolved not to see another romantic comedy about the vipers' nest that is the gay singles scene, make an exception. Writer-director Greg Berlanti's debut feature is bright, breezy and full of deliciously quotable dialogue. The characters ma… (more)

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