The Bride Came C.O.D.

  • 1941
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Comedy

Bette Davis, in her autobiography The Lonely Life, said of this picture: "Jimmy Cagney, with whom I'd always wanted to work in something fine, spent most of his time in the picture removing cactus quills from my behind. This was supposedly hilarious. We romped about the desert and I kept falling into cactus." Most critics did not agree, however, and lauded...read more

Where to Watch

Available to Stream

Rating:

Bette Davis, in her autobiography The Lonely Life, said of this picture: "Jimmy Cagney, with whom I'd always wanted to work in something fine, spent most of his time in the picture removing cactus quills from my behind. This was supposedly hilarious. We romped about the desert and I kept

falling into cactus." Most critics did not agree, however, and lauded her performance in this departure from her usual dramatic fare. Cagney, of course, is tremendous as the pugnacious, rough-housing, down-on-his-luck airline pilot who accepts the job of returning the daughter of a Texas oil

tycoon to her father's ranch, unmarried, for the freight charge of $10 a pound. Through a ruse, Cagney keeps fiance Carson, a Hollywood bandleader Davis has known for only four days, and publicity-hungry broadcaster Erwin from boarding his plane and flies off into the friendly skies with Davis,

who believes she is being kidnaped. She offers him a reward to take her back to Los Angeles but Cagney refuses, telling her he's getting a better price from her father. His plane develops engine trouble, however, and is forced to land in the desert, where they find a ghost town with one

inhabitant, Davenport, a desert hermit who believes Davis's story of the kidnaping and locks Cagney in jail while putting Davis up in the town's rundown hotel. Not to be outfoxed, Carson arrives the next morning with a Nevada justice of the peace and Davis marries him to spite Cagney, even though

she now realizes she loves him. (Those oil heiresses are such a caution.) Pallette shows up and refuses to pay Cagney his freight charges until he discovers Davis's marriage is illegal because the ceremony was performed in California, not Nevada. All ends well when Cagney admits he loves Davis

too, but jocularly insists the only reason he will consider marrying her is because her father is a millionaire. The teaming of Davis and Cagney in this broad farce provides a hefty package of laughs and shows Davis is capable of handling comedy roles with her usual elan.

Cast & Details See all »

  • Rating: NR
  • Review: Bette Davis, in her autobiography The Lonely Life, said of this picture: "Jimmy Cagney, with whom I'd always wanted to work in something fine, spent most of his time in the picture removing cactus quills from my behind. This was supposedly hilarious. We ro… (more)

Show More »

Trending TonightSee all »