The Arrival

  • 1991
  • Movie
  • R
  • Horror, Science Fiction

Many of the names involved with THE ARRIVAL are associates of prolific B-moviemaker Charles Band and his Full Moon Entertainment company. The result is a sort of Full Moon Lite, a picture with the surface gloss of a Band production but nothing inside. An unseen extraterrestrial has crashed to Earth and--like the monsters in TREMORS, burrowed underground...read more

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Many of the names involved with THE ARRIVAL are associates of prolific B-moviemaker Charles Band and his Full Moon Entertainment company. The result is a sort of Full Moon Lite, a picture with the surface gloss of a Band production but nothing inside.

An unseen extraterrestrial has crashed to Earth and--like the monsters in TREMORS, burrowed underground (thus saving filmmakers the inconvenience of having to show it). Early on it enters the body of 73-year-old Max Page (Robert Sampson), who appears to die, but revives in the hospital and

recuperates at an amazing rate. Soon he's home again, seemingly healthy but cursed with a craving for young women's blood and a will that is not his own. Fearful that he might prey upon his own family, Max hits the road, growing younger as he makes his way to San Diego and a pretty nurse named

Connie (Robin Frates) with whom he became infatuated while hospitalized. He kills and feeds on a number of women along the way, and FBI Agent Mills (John Saxon) pieces together the strange truth. In San Diego the feds track down the handsome bloodsucker (now played by Joseph Culp), who's trying to

get a serious relationship going with Connie, despite his routine of murdering ladies every 48 hours. Max refuses to be taken alive, and at the end the alien entity finds a new host.

"The blood's been completely drained from the body! So what are we dealing with here?" Most moviegoers have heard those lines in one form or another more times than they care to count. So what are we dealing with in THE ARRIVAL? Daniel Ljoka's script barely addresses the nature of the unearthly

visitor, indulging instead in metaphorical dreams wherein Max Page bathes in blood with topless babes. The reverse-aging gimmick isn't even explained, although the bloodlust is: the creature needs the hormone estrogen, present in the corpuscles of ovulating females (whom Max can sniff out,

prompting some silly behavior around potential victims). Despite frequent bloodletting most of the throat-slashing occurs tastefully offscreen.

The main characters are stick figures, devoid of personalities. In contrast, some peripheral figures go way overboard, like Michael J. Pollard's one-scene turn as a kooky handyman with an obscenity-spewing parrot. Two Vegas-bound lesbians encountered on the highway appear to be in exile from some

other movie. Fans should watch, though, for a cameo by Full Moon's star director Stuart Gordon (REANIMATOR) as a surly biker, and his actress wife Carolyn Purdy-Gordon in a genuinely funny bit as a convenience store drunk. (Violence, profanity, sexual situations, adult situations, nudity.)

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  • Released: 1991
  • Rating: R
  • Review: Many of the names involved with THE ARRIVAL are associates of prolific B-moviemaker Charles Band and his Full Moon Entertainment company. The result is a sort of Full Moon Lite, a picture with the surface gloss of a Band production but nothing inside. An… (more)

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