That Touch Of Mink

  • 1962
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Comedy, Romance

A bouncy if rather smarmy comedy from the mind of Stanley Shapiro, who also contributed to PILLOW TALK and LOVER COME BACK. Shapiro and coauthor Monaster have come up with a thin plot but scads of funny dialogue enhanced by Grant, Day, and Young in enjoyable performances. Day is out of work in New York and about to cash her unemployment check when Grant's...read more

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A bouncy if rather smarmy comedy from the mind of Stanley Shapiro, who also contributed to PILLOW TALK and LOVER COME BACK. Shapiro and coauthor Monaster have come up with a thin plot but scads of funny dialogue enhanced by Grant, Day, and Young in enjoyable performances. Day is out of

work in New York and about to cash her unemployment check when Grant's passing limousine splashes her with mud. Grant is a corporate raider who has spent his life gobbling up companies and neglecting his personal life. (Humphrey Bogart did the same role in SABRINA.) Day walks into the local

automat. Grant sends Young, his tippling financial advisor, into the restaurant to offer Day money for her muddied dress. Meadows, Day's roommate (in a wisecracking, Eve Arden-like role), and Young tell Day to give Grant what-for if she is so indignant at him. Day marches into Grant's fabulous

office, where her wrath is soon assuaged by Grant's incomparable suavity. When Grant has to make a business trip to Maryland, he invites her to join him and she agrees. Thus begins a whirlwind journey as he takes her to Philadelphia for drinks, to the UN where he gives a speech, then down to

Baltimore for dinner and a game between the Yankees and the Orioles. (Seen briefly are Mickey Mantle, Roger Maris, and Yogi Berra as themselves.) This cat-and-mouse game has to end eventually, and it does when Grant asks Day if she'd like to go to Bermuda with him. The lady doth protest at first,

but when Grant plies her with lavish clothing (designed by Rosemary Odell) and a full-length mink coat, Day changes her mind. As nighttime approaches in their vacation spot, Day realizes that this is nothing out of Plato; Grant wants to take Richmond here, and there is no getting away from it. Day

conveniently breaks out in a rash, leaving Grant to spend the night playing cards. The romantic trip becomes a disaster. Day feels awful about what's happened and wants another chance. Prior to their next date, Day begins to drink to relax herself and falls off a terrace. Grant feels that the

whole affair has been a waste of time and won't call her anymore. Day is frustrated and wants to make Grant jealous, so she asks Young for his help. Young arranges a motel tryst with Astin, an unemployment clerk with a lecherous gleam in his eye. Then Young notifies Grant so he can rescue Day from

this fate. Once Day is out of Astin's clutches, Grant realizes that she is the woman for him. Skin problems, though, once again enter the picture.

Most of the jokes are verbal rather than slapstick in this script, which, rather surprisingly, copped an Oscar nomination. The film whips along like a Formula One car under Mann's capable direction. The main problem is that 58-year-old Grant and 38-year-old Day were getting slightly long in the

tooth for this kind of "will she or won't she?" story. Astin is excellent, appearing in his second movie after WEST SIDE STORY. Right after this, he teamed with Marty Ingels in his first TV series, "I'm Dickens, He's Fenster."

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: A bouncy if rather smarmy comedy from the mind of Stanley Shapiro, who also contributed to PILLOW TALK and LOVER COME BACK. Shapiro and coauthor Monaster have come up with a thin plot but scads of funny dialogue enhanced by Grant, Day, and Young in enjoyab… (more)

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