T-Force

  • 1995
  • Movie
  • R
  • Action, Science Fiction

This combination of THE TERMINATOR, ALIEN NATION, 48 HRS, and countless "buddy-cop" adventures rates as a fair exercise in "creative" celluloid shoplifting. Terrorists take over a high-rise, mowing down scores of slack-jawed victims. As a last resort, the city fathers summon the T-Force, an elite squad of "cybernauts." The androids easily take out the terrorists,...read more

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This combination of THE TERMINATOR, ALIEN NATION, 48 HRS, and countless "buddy-cop" adventures rates as a fair exercise in "creative" celluloid shoplifting.

Terrorists take over a high-rise, mowing down scores of slack-jawed victims. As a last resort, the city fathers summon the T-Force, an elite squad of "cybernauts." The androids easily take out the terrorists, but burly leader Adam Omega (Evan Lurie) ranks termination a priority over protecting the

innocent, and six hostages die. With elections at hand, outraged politicos demand that the T-Force be scrapped, literally.

Hearing this, Adam Omega sets off to destroy all who threaten them, starting with their own designers and the police chief. Remaining cybernaut Cain (Bobby Johnston) sits impassively during the massacres and allows himself to be captured, for his programming still respects human law and order.

Robot-hating officer Jack Floyd (Jack Scalia) is reluctantly teamed with Cain to hunt the renegades. The oddly-matched couple pick off other cybernauts amid fiery explosions and car crashes, and Jack comes to like and respect his "tin man" partner.

By the time Cain is mortally damaged by Adam Omega, Jack Floyd's opinion of artificial intelligence has altered so much he gives the last cybernaut a chance to surrender peacefully. Adam Omega won't, of course, and is summarily blown to bits. A melancholy finale finds Jack installing Cain's

"brain" in a desktop unit and reviving the big guy's consciousness, apparently for perpetual card games and banter.

T-FORCE's script throws a curve by not revealing right away that this is a future society where humanoid robots and holographic projections are commonplace (though an apparent dialogue oversight nails the year as 1997). While it pays lip service to Asimov's First Law of Robotics, the film might

have worked better had its synthetic protagonists followed Arnold Schwarzenegger's example and behaved more like machines and less like common thugs, the low point being the lone female cybernaut (Jennifer MacDonald) being inspired by a porno mag to try having sex with Adam Omega; cybernauts are

anatomically correct right down to bikini tan lines.

Director Richard Pepin, who with co-producer Joseph Merhi cranked out gigabytes of forgettable straight-to-video actioners, keeps the energy level high, at least until the tedious male-bonding scenes in which Jack Floyd teaches Cain to play pool and unburdens, man-to-robot, about how technology

made his dear auto-worker dad obsolete. Scalia gives his streetwise role a workout, but no more so than did Nick Nolte, James Woods, James Caan, and many other veterans of Hollywood's buddy-cop beat patrol. The performers hit their marks, abetted in no small way by an army of stuntmen.

T-FORCE will meet, perhaps even exceed, expectations of action fans not bugged by pirated plot software.(Graphic violence, nudity, sexual situations, substance abuse, profanity.)

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  • Released: 1995
  • Rating: R
  • Review: This combination of THE TERMINATOR, ALIEN NATION, 48 HRS, and countless "buddy-cop" adventures rates as a fair exercise in "creative" celluloid shoplifting. Terrorists take over a high-rise, mowing down scores of slack-jawed victims. As a last resort, the… (more)

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