Sweetie

  • 1929
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Musical

Though drifting far from a realistic rendition of college life, SWEETIE is an enjoyable little picture that is light on plot line but heavy in the charm category. This includes two song numbers which could easily be considered musical classics. The first of these has Kane spouting off "He's So Unusual" to her oaf of a boy friend who's more interested in...read more

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Though drifting far from a realistic rendition of college life, SWEETIE is an enjoyable little picture that is light on plot line but heavy in the charm category. This includes two song numbers which could easily be considered musical classics. The first of these has Kane spouting off

"He's So Unusual" to her oaf of a boy friend who's more interested in football than in her. Then Jack Oakie does an imitation of Al Jolson with black-face and bent knee to a song entitled "Alma Mammy." The yarn centers around Carroll as a Broadway star and the new owner of a North Carolina college

which has a small girls' school just a few miles away. Carroll's sweetheart, Smith, is a student at the college and subsequent star of the football team. Trouble arises when Carroll is more concerned with eloping than with her college, while Smith refuses to let his teammates down in the upcoming

big game against their rival school. The owner then goes about finding ways to keep her beau off the playing field. But she doesn't succeed. Songs include: "My Sweeter Than Sweet," "The Prep Step," "I Think You'll Like It," "Alma Mammy" (sung by Jack Oakie), "Bear Down Pelham" (Richard A. Whiting,

George Marion, Jr.), "He's So Unusual" (Al Lewis, Abner Silver, Al Sherman), "Sweetie" (sung by Helen Kane).

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: Though drifting far from a realistic rendition of college life, SWEETIE is an enjoyable little picture that is light on plot line but heavy in the charm category. This includes two song numbers which could easily be considered musical classics. The first o… (more)

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