Suzy

  • 1936
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Drama, War

Harlow's only film with Grant (and her fourth with Tone) had a few fine moments but was generally not up to the talents of those involved. The screenwriters worked with the title and some of the incidents of the novel, but generally dispensed with the original premise. In 1914 London, Harlow is working as a showgirl. She's in love with Tone, who is an inventor...read more

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Harlow's only film with Grant (and her fourth with Tone) had a few fine moments but was generally not up to the talents of those involved. The screenwriters worked with the title and some of the incidents of the novel, but generally dispensed with the original premise. In 1914 London,

Harlow is working as a showgirl. She's in love with Tone, who is an inventor from Ireland. He's currently working for an engineering firm owned by Meyer, a German national. Tone and Harlow marry, but instead of checking into a hotel, Tone proudly takes his new wife to see his latest invention.

While at the factory, Harlow notes that Meyer is having a late-night meeting with Hume, and she wonders why these two women would choose to do business at that hour. Hume is a spy, and Meyer thinks that Tone might be aware of the fact that Hume and Meyer are in cahoots in a cabal against England.

Though Tone is unaware of the alliance, Meyer tells Hume to knock him off. Later, Harlow and Tone are at his apartment, preparing to spend their first night together, when Hume enters, her face covered so she can't be identified. She shoots Tone, then throws the gun on the floor and flees. Harlow

thinks that there is nothing she can do for her bridegroom, so she panics and runs, rather than face the police who, she believes, will blame her for Tone's death.

Harlow races across the channel to Paris and moves in with Courtney, who helps her get work at a local nightspot. Harlow thinks she is a widow, and doesn't know that Hume wasn't a good enough shot to kill Tone. He's now recovered from his wound and wonders where his wife is. Further, Meyer and all

of her fellow spies have been arrested, with the sole exception of Hume. The assassination at Sarajevo leads to WW I, and Harlow is stuck in Paris, where she meets dashing aviator Grant, a French pilot whose derring-do is legendary in Europe. Grant woos and wins Harlow, and they are married almost

instantly. Grant comes from a noble family, and his father, Stone, is not so sure that he approves of this blonde his son has married. Harlow is engaging and soon wins Stone over, especially since she is totally faithful to Grant, who starts to cheat on her before the wedding bed has gotten cold.

In London, Tone has perfected a new airplane, and there is only one man with the skill and the guts to fly it, Grant. But Grant has been hurt in an air battle and is currently recovering in the hospital. Tone comes to Paris and is shocked to see Harlow. She explains that she thought Hume had

plugged him for keeps, otherwise she would have stayed and nursed him back to health. Tone is adamant, calling her a fortune hunter and denouncing her for departing when he was bleeding. Harlow is a bigamist, although Tone doesn't let on that she and he are still married. One of Grant's many

amours is Hume, who he doesn't know is a spy. Harlow isn't aware of Hume and Grant until she sees a photo of the two in a local publication. She shows this to Tone and lets him know that she thinks it was Hume who fired the shots in reel one.

Grant has recovered and flown off to Hume's country mansion for a tryst. He is having a last fling before returning to the war. Tone and Harlow know this and race along the road in an attempt to head him off. Before any of this can happen, Hume's thug shoots Grant, and she and her aide race away.

Grant's airplane is at the chateau, and Tone climbs into it and chases Hume's car. Since Grant's plane is battle-equipped, Tone machine-guns the fleeing car and kills the two. Next, he goes after some overhead German Spads, shoots three of them down in flames and winds up in a crash landing at

Hume's home. Harlow races to him and informs Tone that Grant is dead. They decide that Grant should be honored as the man who brought down the planes and uncovered Hume's plot. Grant's body is put in the pilot's seat, and he is posthumously awarded a medal for his work. Tone and Harlow are

reunited when he finally believes Harlow is really contrite about what happened and wants to make this second chance work. That's a lot of story for 99 minutes, but it never feels crammed, just brisk. Good air footage, some funny scenes, and even a hit song, "Did I Remember?" (Walter Donaldson,

Harold Adamson), which was nominated for an Oscar.

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: Harlow's only film with Grant (and her fourth with Tone) had a few fine moments but was generally not up to the talents of those involved. The screenwriters worked with the title and some of the incidents of the novel, but generally dispensed with the orig… (more)

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