Sunbonnet Sue

  • 1945
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Comedy, Musical

A pleasant farce that supplies a good many musical numbers evoking memories of the good old days. In turn-of-the-century, Lower East Side New York, Storm plays a young woman who gets a kick out of singing and dancing in her father's seedy saloon. Her aunt Gombell sees this conduct as a possible threat to her own social position, as some light may be thrown...read more

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A pleasant farce that supplies a good many musical numbers evoking memories of the good old days. In turn-of-the-century, Lower East Side New York, Storm plays a young woman who gets a kick out of singing and dancing in her father's seedy saloon. Her aunt Gombell sees this conduct as a

possible threat to her own social position, as some light may be thrown on her own Bowery beginnings. The conniving lady sets up a fight that forces the tavern to be closed, so her niece must come live at her luxurious home. It doesn't take too long before Gombell's plans are discovered, but,

before a settlement can be arranged, tensions flare. In the wake of upheavals in the industry, Monogram was attempting to upgrade its product with this film; the larger studios were in the process of being sued by the government for violations of the Sherman Anti-Trust Act, charged with

monopolizing distribution facilities. The time seemed ripe for lesser lights such as Monogram to try to join the giants. The studio threw major talent into the picture, which might have been made by any of the larger studios. Producer Dunlap was an officer of the corporation; writer/director

Murphy had scored with MRS. WIGGS OF THE CABBAGE PATCH in 1942. During the year, Monogram, as usual, cranked out more pictures than 20th Century-Fox, Paramount, Warner Bros., or Universal, but most of them were cheapies with limited distribution and short runs; the studio grossed only about $6

million during the year, compared to Fox's $178 million. Songs include: "School Days," "Sunbonnet Sue" (Gus Edwards, Will D. Cobb), "The Bowery" (Charles H. Hoyt, Percy Gaunt), "Yip-I-Addy-I-Ay" (Cobb, John H. Flynn), "Yoo Hoo, Ain't You Comin' Out Tonight?" (Carson Robison), "By the Light of the

Silvery Moon" (Ed Madden, Edwards), "If I Had My Way" (Lou Klein, James Kendis), "While Strolling Through the Park One Day" (Ed Haley), "Donegal," "Roll Dem Bones," and "Look for the Rainbow" (Ralph Murphy, C. Harold Lewis).

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: A pleasant farce that supplies a good many musical numbers evoking memories of the good old days. In turn-of-the-century, Lower East Side New York, Storm plays a young woman who gets a kick out of singing and dancing in her father's seedy saloon. Her aunt… (more)

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