Striking Point

  • 1995
  • Movie
  • R
  • Action, Crime

A consortium of Cleveland and Texas filmmakers ground out this hapless actioner, cheaply lensed in Dallas and Tijuana. Det. Nick Harris (Stan Morse) is burdened by a cocaine habit, grief over his wife's random murder, and guilt over the recent fatal shooting of his partner by a mysterious, heavily-armed Slavic gang. Freshly teamed with comic-relief rookie...read more

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A consortium of Cleveland and Texas filmmakers ground out this hapless actioner, cheaply lensed in Dallas and Tijuana.

Det. Nick Harris (Stan Morse) is burdened by a cocaine habit, grief over his wife's random murder, and guilt over the recent fatal shooting of his partner by a mysterious, heavily-armed Slavic gang. Freshly teamed with comic-relief rookie John Burke (Jeff Blanchard), Harris perseveres, and the

buddy-cops learn the new killers in town were KGB agents in the former USSR, now criminal capitalists importing Red Army artillery into America. Lead villain Romanov (Christopher Mitchum) has the heroes captured, tortured, doped, coerced to play Russian roulette, and, worst of all, forced to

listen to his endless speeches ("We're very much alike, you and I..."). The news that Romanov was behind Nick's wife's slaying triggers an inept showdown between the good guys and the no-goodniks against a giant Soviet flag, with grenades going off in all directions.

It was apparently left up to the actors to decide whether to speak in Russian or English, though they naturally switch to the latter to badmouth Old Glory and the Constitution for some achingly banal, retro Cold-War antagonism. Both Morse and Blanchard are at least 10 years too young for the

characters they're supposed to be, and spend most of their time in male- bonding bull sessions and lighting each others' cigarettes (even while gravely wounded and under fire). Blanchard seems like a leaner, action-hero version of John Candy, and following STRIKING POINT, the two leads found their

niche performing in an improvisational comedy troupe in Cleveland. Freely borrowing from the Hong Kong gangster dramas of John Woo, STRIKING POINT played overseas markets and went to direct-to-video obscurity in the US, though B-movie buffs may note that cinematographer Tony Brownrigg is the son

of S.F. Brownrigg, who crafted the drive-in perennial DON'T LOOK IN THE BASEMENT.(Graphic violence, nudity, substance abuse, extreme profanity.)

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  • Released: 1995
  • Rating: R
  • Review: A consortium of Cleveland and Texas filmmakers ground out this hapless actioner, cheaply lensed in Dallas and Tijuana. Det. Nick Harris (Stan Morse) is burdened by a cocaine habit, grief over his wife's random murder, and guilt over the recent fatal shoot… (more)

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