Step Lively

  • 1944
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Comedy, Musical

In 1944, Frank Sinatra was the biggest singing star in show business. He got his first movie top-billing in STEP LIVELY, a musical version of the old play "Room Service" (which also served as the springboard for the 1938 Marx Brothers film). Sinatra plays Glen, a yokel who has written a play and sent a copy of it--along with his savings of $1,500--to fast-talking...read more

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In 1944, Frank Sinatra was the biggest singing star in show business. He got his first movie top-billing in STEP LIVELY, a musical version of the old play "Room Service" (which also served as the springboard for the 1938 Marx Brothers film). Sinatra plays Glen, a yokel who has written a

play and sent a copy of it--along with his savings of $1,500--to fast-talking producer Miller (George Murphy). Checking up on the status of his work, Glen finds Miller holed up in a New York City hotel with 22 actors and a large unpaid bill and learns that his money has been used to finance

another show, now in rehearsals. Enter attorney Jenkins (Eugene Pallette), representing a client who will give Miller $50,000 for his new production on the proviso that it feature his "protege," Miss Abbott (Anne Jeffreys). Miss Abbott becomes attracted to Glen, as does showgirl Christine (Gloria

DeHaven). When the mysterious mentor's check bounces, Miller rushes to mount the new show, a musical, before his own checks go bad; at the same time, he dodges the hotel manager (Walter Slezak) and the manager's boss (Adolphe Menjou). Miller must also evade the questions of Glen, who wants to know

what's going to be done with his play. Meanwhile, the musical still lacks a male lead--that is, until Miller hears Glen sing. Reluctantly accepting the role, Glen steps in, sings his lungs out, ensures that the show is a hit, winds up with Christine, and apparently gives up playwrighting for

crooning. The film earned an Oscar nomination for its art direction. Sinatra sings several tunes by Sammy Cahn and Jule Styne, including "Some Other Time," "As Long as There's Music," "Where Does Love Begin?," and "Come Out, Come Out, Wherever You Are." Other songs are "Why Must There Be an

Opening Song?" "And Then You Kissed Me," and "Ask the Madame."

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: In 1944, Frank Sinatra was the biggest singing star in show business. He got his first movie top-billing in STEP LIVELY, a musical version of the old play "Room Service" (which also served as the springboard for the 1938 Marx Brothers film). Sinatra plays… (more)

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