State Of Siege

  • 1972
  • Movie
  • PG
  • Political, Thriller

Taking aim at the repressive right-wing government of a Latin American country (a thinly veiled Uruguay) and the support it received from at least one employee of the US Agency for International Development (AID), Costa-Gavras offers here another tightly knit political thriller along the lines of his Z, MISSING and THE CONFESSION. Set in the 1970s, STATE...read more

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Taking aim at the repressive right-wing government of a Latin American country (a thinly veiled Uruguay) and the support it received from at least one employee of the US Agency for International Development (AID), Costa-Gavras offers here another tightly knit political thriller along the

lines of his Z, MISSING and THE CONFESSION. Set in the 1970s, STATE OF SEIGE chronicles the kidnaping of AID "traffic expert" Philip Santore (Yves Montand) by Tupamaro-like left-wing guerrillas who are determined to prove he is behind the introduction of sophisticated torture methods in their

country and in others as well--an international criminal. As the guerrillas try to extract a confession from the wounded but cool Santore, the government's search begins to zero in on their location, with tension mounting as the demand for a prisoner exchange is rejected by the government. When

Santore confesses, his captors are left with the difficult decision of whether or not to execute him. Told mostly in flashback and allegedly based on the case of real-life AID officer Daniel Mitrione, STATE OF SIEGE was banned from the American Film Institute theater in Washington upon its

release, its opponents arguing that it glorified assassination and was violently anti-American. Never one to pull political punches, Costa-Gavras delivers yet another impassioned, intensely dramatic indictment of the abuse of power.

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  • Released: 1972
  • Rating: PG
  • Review: Taking aim at the repressive right-wing government of a Latin American country (a thinly veiled Uruguay) and the support it received from at least one employee of the US Agency for International Development (AID), Costa-Gavras offers here another tightly k… (more)

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