Stand Up And Be Counted

  • 1972
  • Movie
  • PG
  • Comedy, Drama

An awkward presentation of the Women's Liberation movement and its effect upon various relationships in the Denver area. Among those involved are Bisset, as a journalist for a fashion magazine; her kid sister Purcell, as an ultra-feminist who draws up a contract to have a baby; Stevens, as the sex-starved wife of a wealthy manufacturer; and Swit, as a typical...read more

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An awkward presentation of the Women's Liberation movement and its effect upon various relationships in the Denver area. Among those involved are Bisset, as a journalist for a fashion magazine; her kid sister Purcell, as an ultra-feminist who draws up a contract to have a baby; Stevens,

as the sex-starved wife of a wealthy manufacturer; and Swit, as a typical wife and mother. All these women gain something from the movement, but you wouldn't think so by the way the material is handled. Several of the performances are quite good, but they're really all for naught. However, as the

first Hollywood film to examine the Women's Movement, STAND UP AND BE COUNTED has some historical significance. Obviously, by 1972 this social trend was visible enough to encourage filmmakers to make a movie about it; however, this movie's creators didn't take the movement seriously enough to do

it justice. As evidence, the screenwriter assigned to the job, Bernard Slade, also wrote the scripts for TV series such as "The Flying Nun" and "The Partridge Family," programs not exactly known for their hard-hitting material. The line between serious statement and comic relief is fuzzy at best,

and what might pass for an illuminating examination of an important issue is negated by traditional gags thrown in at the expense of women. An insider's joke of interest to true connoisseurs is the face on the mock dollar bill used during the demonstration scenes. It belongs to veteran actress

Binnie Barnes, wife of producer Frankovich.

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  • Released: 1972
  • Rating: PG
  • Review: An awkward presentation of the Women's Liberation movement and its effect upon various relationships in the Denver area. Among those involved are Bisset, as a journalist for a fashion magazine; her kid sister Purcell, as an ultra-feminist who draws up a co… (more)

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