Speed Of Life

  • 2002
  • Movie
  • R
  • Drama

A curious hybrid of disaffected-youth movie and terminal-illness weepie, this no-way-out drama generates considerable sympathy for a protagonist hemmed in by dwindling options. College age Drew (Scott Caan) is devoted to his (Leo Burmester), who was crippled by a stroke, and also nurses him vigilantly. Drew repairs motorcycles and attends some college classes,...read more

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Reviewed by Robert Pardi
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A curious hybrid of disaffected-youth movie and terminal-illness weepie, this no-way-out drama generates considerable sympathy for a protagonist hemmed in by dwindling options. College age Drew (Scott Caan) is devoted to his (Leo Burmester), who was crippled by a stroke, and also nurses him vigilantly. Drew repairs motorcycles and attends some college classes, but feels his life is a crumbling ruin like the rundown Queens, New York, neighborhood in which he lives. Drew's his memories of his father as an engineering professor and devoted parent keep from even considering a convalescent home. Drew's pal Anthony (Anthony Ruvivar) tries to entice him into making some easy money selling drugs, but Drew's not interested. Then rich Manhattanite Sarah (Mia Kirshner) sashays into his life on a heroin buy, and Drew can't resist sleeping with her and sharing her drugs. As his father's condition deteriorates — he showing symptoms of Alzheimer's Disease and having seizures — Drew is drawn more deeply into the escape Sarah represents. When Drew's dad wheels himself out onto the street, a concerned cop warns Drew to take better care of the old man. He can't help but think how much easier things would be if he worked for Anthony; then he could afford proper care for his father. Drew drops out of school and starts to think about euthanasia. Then party girl Sarah sleeps with Anthony because he has easy access to dope. How will Drew handle his bleak future? This character study sensitively explores the debilitating side effects of being a caregiver, and while its exploration of the drug culture is a bit hokey there's no question as to the film's sincerity.

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  • Released: 2002
  • Rating: R
  • Review: A curious hybrid of disaffected-youth movie and terminal-illness weepie, this no-way-out drama generates considerable sympathy for a protagonist hemmed in by dwindling options. College age Drew (Scott Caan) is devoted to his (Leo Burmester), who was crippl… (more)

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