Soul In The Hole

  • 1997
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Documentary

Comparisons to HOOP DREAMS are inevitable, so here goes: No, Danielle Gardner's documentary about Brooklyn's summertime street basketball tournaments is not as technically accomplished; it does not share that film's emotional sweep; and, at half the running time, it doesn't come close to HOOP DREAM's epic scope. Gardner's film, however, is a raw, rough-and-tumble...read more

Where to Watch

Available to Stream

  • Watch on
Reviewed by Ken Fox
Rating:

Comparisons to HOOP DREAMS are inevitable, so here goes: No, Danielle Gardner's documentary about Brooklyn's summertime street basketball tournaments is not as technically accomplished; it does not share that film's emotional sweep; and, at half the running

time, it doesn't come close to HOOP DREAM's epic scope. Gardner's film, however, is a raw, rough-and-tumble portrait of a urban American pastime that many suburbanites know nothing about. Played all summer long on playgrounds across New York City, street basketball is a highly organized game with

its own rules, teams and superstars. Gardner follows Bedford-Stuyvesant's popular "Kenny's Kings," a team coached by 32-year-old liquor store operator Kenny Jones and featuring star point guard Ed "Booger" Smith, a teenager Jones took into his home after Booger's mother kicked him out. In near

100-degree heat, the Kings tear their way up the community-run tournament ladder, trouncing opponents at tournaments with names like Soul in the Hole, Malcolm X Invitational and It's a Fila Thang as they head for suspenseful do-or-die moment on Championship Sunday. It may run

a little too long -- Gardner would have done better to end the film after the final tournament and forgo Booger's brief stint at college -- but it's brisk and fascinating nonetheless, offering a rare glimpse into a thriving but largely ignored subculture and the vibrant community that surrounds

it.

Cast & Details See all »

  • Released: 1997
  • Rating: NR
  • Review: Comparisons to HOOP DREAMS are inevitable, so here goes: No, Danielle Gardner's documentary about Brooklyn's summertime street basketball tournaments is not as technically accomplished; it does not share that film's emotional sweep; and, at half the runnin… (more)

Show More »

Trending TonightSee all »