Snatch2000 | Movie

Cast & Crew  |  Review

Guy Ritchie's follow-up to LOCK, STOCK AND TWO SMOKING BARRELS offers more of what made his debut such larky fun: More eccentric toughs, more rapid-fire dialogue, more escalating mayhem, more underworld slang. This time out, the colorful charact… (more)

Released: 2000

Rating: R

User Rating: (16 ratings)

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Reviewed by Maitland McDonagh
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Guy Ritchie's follow-up to LOCK, STOCK AND TWO SMOKING BARRELS offers more of

what made his debut such larky fun: More eccentric toughs, more rapid-fire

dialogue, more escalating mayhem, more underworld slang. This time out, the

colorful characters include thick-skulled pawn shop owners, gimlet-eyed twins,

crooked fight promoters, gypsies, a lunatic Uzbekhistani gun dealer and a

sweet-faced dog that's swallowed a squeak-toy and barks with a high-pitched

wheeze. But the film is a bit exhausting, like being trapped inside a pinball

machine with a plot. It all begins in Antwerp, where Franky Four Fingers (Benicio Del Toro) and a pickup gang, disguised as Hasidim, steal a whopper

of an 84-carat diamond. En route to delivering the prize to his New York boss, Avi (Dennis Farina), Frankie stops in London with an eye to unloading some smaller

gems on Avi's cousin (Mike Reid) and buying a gun from Boris the Blade (Rade

Sherbedgia). But compulsive gambler Frankie walks into a setup when Boris

suggests he place a bet on an illegal boxing match organized by vicious

old-time gangster Brick Top (Alan Ford) and genial small-time promoters Turkish (Jason Statham) and Tommy (Stephen Graham). Unfortunately for

everyone, pawn-shop owners Vinny (Robbie Gee) and Sol (Lennie James), who are

supposed to steal the diamond from Frankie on Boris's behalf, are world-class

screw-ups. Turkish and Tommy, meanwhile, are in hot water with Brick Top

because their fighter can't make the match, but think they've salvaged the

situation when gypsy bare-knuckle champ Mickey (Brad Pitt) agrees to fight in

his place. Little do they know their troubles are just beginning. There's

never a dull moment, between the narrative contrivances and Ritchie's

incessant use of off-kilter camera angles, rapid-fire cutting and jagged

little hops back and forth in time. More isn't always better; everything feels

slightly forced, and the funny bits — make no mistake, there are several

— are all but lost in the noise.

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