Slumber Party Massacre II

  • 1987
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Horror

The original SLUMBER PARTY MASSACRE is one of the few films in the slasher genre directed and written by women (Amy Jones and Rita Mae Brown, respectively). The sequel carries on that vaguely feminist tradition, having been produced, directed, and written by Deborah Brock. The film gets underway as Courtney (Crystal Bernard), the sister of the girl who...read more

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The original SLUMBER PARTY MASSACRE is one of the few films in the slasher genre directed and written by women (Amy Jones and Rita Mae Brown, respectively). The sequel carries on that vaguely feminist tradition, having been produced, directed, and written by Deborah Brock. The film gets

underway as Courtney (Crystal Bernard), the sister of the girl who survived SPM I, goes off on a weekend trip with the other members of her all-girl rock band. They plan to stay at the new condominium owned by one member's father, and some guys are going to join them. Plagued by dreams in which a

black-leather-clad rockabilly singer (Atanas Ilitch) with an auger at the end of his guitar attacks her and her friends, Courtney repeatedly wakes up in hysterics, and her friends begin to grow upset with her. Suddenly, though, he actually appears, gleefully drilling the boys and girls while doing

little dance steps. The rockabilly killer is probably the most entertaining slasher ever to grace the screen--sort of like Elvis Presley playing Norman Bates, complete with musical numbers. Usually it's no mystery why some films go straight to video without theatrical release, but this movie is

far above the caliber of most straight-to-video releases. Perhaps on tape this funny and original horror film will gain the cult audience that it deserves.

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  • Released: 1987
  • Rating: NR
  • Review: The original SLUMBER PARTY MASSACRE is one of the few films in the slasher genre directed and written by women (Amy Jones and Rita Mae Brown, respectively). The sequel carries on that vaguely feminist tradition, having been produced, directed, and written… (more)

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