Silver River

  • 1948
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Western

The seventh and final collaboration between director Walsh and star Flynn was a clunker and came nowhere near the excitement and verve of their previous works. The picture begins with lots of action then disintegrates into talkiness. It's quite unsatisfying for many reasons, the most important of which is that Flynn is seen as a power-hungry cad who will...read more

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The seventh and final collaboration between director Walsh and star Flynn was a clunker and came nowhere near the excitement and verve of their previous works. The picture begins with lots of action then disintegrates into talkiness. It's quite unsatisfying for many reasons, the most

important of which is that Flynn is seen as a power-hungry cad who will stop at nothing to gain his goals. Flynn is tossed out of the Union Army and takes up gambling for a living, then uses his strength to move in on the silver mining business and winds up as an important man in the area. He

loves Sheridan but she's married to Bennett, who works for Flynn; he deliberately sends Bennett into a situation where the man is killed so Flynn can marry his widow. Mitchell is Flynn's boozy attorney and helps him expand his interests. When Sheridan sees what kind of a man Flynn really is, she

leaves him. He then realizes that he's been on the wrong path so he changes his ways and begins to fight on behalf of the poor and downtrodden. MacLane makes a fine villain and D'Andrea as Flynn's sidekick does a good portrayal of a pal who sticks by his friend through almost everything. Shot in

the High Sierras, Calabasas and Hollywood, SILVER RIVER was based on an unpublished novel by Stephen Longstreet, who has had a long career as a water colorist. The love story in this movie is a thinly veiled 1860s version of the David and Bathsheba tale. Walsh and Flynn were long time pals and

made a pact that required Flynn to stay sober until after five in the afternoon, at which time Walsh would sit down and tipple with Flynn. Walsh was a stern taskmaster who could always control the mercurial Tasmanian. But three years had passed since their last film, and Flynn grew restless under

Walsh's restraint this time and seemed uninterested in the material.

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: The seventh and final collaboration between director Walsh and star Flynn was a clunker and came nowhere near the excitement and verve of their previous works. The picture begins with lots of action then disintegrates into talkiness. It's quite unsatisfyin… (more)

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