Shy People

  • 1988
  • Movie
  • R
  • Drama

The fourth American film from Soviet emigre Andrei Konchalovsky (MARIA'S LOVERS; RUNAWAY TRAIN; and DUET FOR ONE preceded), SHY PEOPLE is about a meeting of two people, and two worlds, who initially appear to be diametrically opposed but who, we learn by the film's end, have more in common than we imagined. The film opens in Manhattan, where Cosmopolitan...read more

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The fourth American film from Soviet emigre Andrei Konchalovsky (MARIA'S LOVERS; RUNAWAY TRAIN; and DUET FOR ONE preceded), SHY PEOPLE is about a meeting of two people, and two worlds, who initially appear to be diametrically opposed but who, we learn by the film's end, have more in

common than we imagined. The film opens in Manhattan, where Cosmopolitan reporter Diana Sullivan (Jill Clayburgh) lives with her teenaged coke-sniffing daughter, Grace (Martha Plimpton). At her editor's suggestion, Diana has traced her own roots back to the Louisiana Bayou and talks her bored

daughter into accompanying her on a visit to the relatives. As Diana and Grace reveal their urban dependencies, the Cajun cousins reveal their backwoods, superstitious ways. Ruth Sullivan (Barbara Hershey) informs her guests that the family is watched over by her former husband, the outlaw Joe,

though he hasn't been seen for over 15 years. The film is full of strange and wonderful events, and in the course of the action the two women grow and change as a result of their exposure to one another. As in his 1985 RUNAWAY TRAIN, Konchalovsky here presents powerful characterizations, beautiful

imagery, and philosophical content as entertainment that can appeal to the average filmgoer but that also still has enough depth to stand up to critical analysis.

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  • Released: 1988
  • Rating: R
  • Review: The fourth American film from Soviet emigre Andrei Konchalovsky (MARIA'S LOVERS; RUNAWAY TRAIN; and DUET FOR ONE preceded), SHY PEOPLE is about a meeting of two people, and two worlds, who initially appear to be diametrically opposed but who, we learn by t… (more)

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