Shoot The Works

  • 1934
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Musical

Oakie is a lovable louse who's mad about Dell. She finally realizes the guy's okay just before she is about to marry another. Set against a carnival backdrop, this skimpily plotted film also had a sub-plot involving Frawley as a Broadway columnist engaged in a comic feud with Bernie, a radio maestro. The action takes place at Hubert's Museum, a cheesy joint...read more

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Oakie is a lovable louse who's mad about Dell. She finally realizes the guy's okay just before she is about to marry another. Set against a carnival backdrop, this skimpily plotted film also had a sub-plot involving Frawley as a Broadway columnist engaged in a comic feud with Bernie, a

radio maestro. The action takes place at Hubert's Museum, a cheesy joint which later became a starting point for 1960s media sensation Tiny Tim. (Hubert's was also immortalized in a marvelous routine by comedian Lenny Bruce.) Unfortunately there's little to this piece other than the music. The

songs--including "Do I Love You?" (Ralph Rainger, Leo Robin), "Were Your Ears Burning?", "With My Eyes Wide Open I'm Dreaming," sung by Dell, and "In the Good Old Wintertime" (Mack Gordon, Harry Revel)--are catchy enough but never elevate this to anything more than a minor musical. The film was

based on a play by talented writers Fowler and Hecht (though they weren't credited), and the title was taken from a revue by Heywood Broun. Dell died shortly after completion of the film, as did fellow player Cody. The not-yet-famous Ann Sheridan, then known as Clara Lou Sheridan, has a bit part.

Songs also include "Take a Lesson from the Larks" (Rainger, Robin), "A Bowl of Chop Suey," "You-ey" (Al Goering, Ben Bernie).

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: Oakie is a lovable louse who's mad about Dell. She finally realizes the guy's okay just before she is about to marry another. Set against a carnival backdrop, this skimpily plotted film also had a sub-plot involving Frawley as a Broadway columnist engaged… (more)

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