Shoot For The Sun

  • 1986
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Crime

On bleak Edinburgh back streets first-time Scottish director Knox delves into the world of heroin trafficking. Nail is the supplier for sleazy dealers who meet him in bathrooms or lurk in dark doorways. Cox, his partner, provides muscle for the operation and does some dealing of his own, with his wife, Clee, helping on occasion. Cox begins to have strong...read more

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On bleak Edinburgh back streets first-time Scottish director Knox delves into the world of heroin trafficking. Nail is the supplier for sleazy dealers who meet him in bathrooms or lurk in dark doorways. Cox, his partner, provides muscle for the operation and does some dealing of his own,

with his wife, Clee, helping on occasion. Cox begins to have strong reservations about dealing in heroin, but the much more cynical Nail isn't about to let him leave the operation. Things get even more complicated and dangerous when a rival gang decides to force Nail out of business and take over

his territory. Director Knox gives a documentary-like feel to his film and the performances are convincing, particularly those of Cox and Nail. Yet the characters lack the complexity necessary to demonstrate why they've become involved in this sordid way of life. Certainly the limited expectations

and prospects experienced by many in the United Kingdom can be offered as an explanation, but it shouldn't be up to the viewer to supply the characters' motivations. In one scene an angry Nail exits from a posh restaurant after dealing with a condescending waiter and wrestles with a fake palm

tree, nearly climbing it before smashing it to plastic bits. But if this is meant to offer the restrictions of class as the root of Nail's predicament, the idea isn't developed any further. SHOOT FOR THE SUN also offers little insight into the plight of the addict. Even a film like Jerry

Schatzberg's PANIC IN NEEDLE PARK gives more of a sense of the obsessiveness of heroin addiction. Here love is shown to be unable to compete with addiction and Knox even attempts to manipulate the audience to feel that this is so, but his heavy-handed efforts lack substance. Despite its grim

subject matter there are a number of funny moments in the film, many of them provided by the gangsters, though thick Scottish accents make it difficult to understand them and much of the film's dialog. Originally shot in 16mm.

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  • Released: 1986
  • Rating: NR
  • Review: On bleak Edinburgh back streets first-time Scottish director Knox delves into the world of heroin trafficking. Nail is the supplier for sleazy dealers who meet him in bathrooms or lurk in dark doorways. Cox, his partner, provides muscle for the operation a… (more)

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