Seven Thieves

  • 1960
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Crime

There have been many copies of RIFIFI since the early 1950s, some of which have been awful and some excellent. This film falls into the latter category. Robinson was beginning his fourth decade as a hoodlum star, and not many actors could play tough guys better than he could. This time he's a former scientist who realizes he doesn't have much time left...read more

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There have been many copies of RIFIFI since the early 1950s, some of which have been awful and some excellent. This film falls into the latter category. Robinson was beginning his fourth decade as a hoodlum star, and not many actors could play tough guys better than he could. This time

he's a former scientist who realizes he doesn't have much time left and wants to commit the perfect crime. Robinson enlists six accomplices to help him carry out his plan. Prominent among them is Steiger, a recently released crook and old acquaintace of Robinson's. Meeting on the French Riviera,

Robinson and Steiger spar verbally in a funny scene that shows both men jockeying for position. Once Steiger is committed to the project--the robbery of millions from the casino at Monte Carlo--the crew of criminals is rounded out by Collins, a sexpot chorine; Wallach, her boyfriend; Dante, a

jumpy safe-cracker; Kroeger, an expert wheel man; and Scourby, the insider who works as the right-hand man to the boss of the casino, Cabot. The first half of the film is devoted to gathering the conspirators and planning the robbery. The second half depicts the robbery itself and the plot-twist

ending. Collins supposedly seduces Scourby; Wallach fakes a suicide in the casino to divert the security guards. While this goes on, Steiger and Dante make their way to the rooms where the money is kept. The heist is successful, but the cash is in huge denominations that are registered, so the

crooks can not do anything with their take. Robinson is so thrilled by having pulled off the job that his heart gives out, and when the other six realize that there is no way they can spend the money, they return it to the casino. The ending is a bit of a disappointment because the characters are

so engaging that we want them to succeed, especially since they don't hurt or kill anyone. Until the conclusion, SEVEN THIEVES is a tight, taut, and superior heist film with well-drawn characters. Well-directed by Hathaway and beautifully photographed by Levitt, the film would have benefitted

greatly by being shot in color. (It was nominated by the Academy for Best Costume Design for a black-and-white film.) Frontiere's score adds nicely to the tension. The chief of detectives was played by John Beradino, who went on to great success in "General Hospital" but whom sports fans may

remember as being the light-hitting infielder for the St. Louis Browns.

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: There have been many copies of RIFIFI since the early 1950s, some of which have been awful and some excellent. This film falls into the latter category. Robinson was beginning his fourth decade as a hoodlum star, and not many actors could play tough guys b… (more)

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