Secret Of The Incas

  • 1954
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Adventure

SECRET OF THE INCAS looks terrific with sweeping vistas and wide expanses of Peru's Machu Picchu region. It is only when the actors begin to talk that the movie starts to lose momentum; the dialog is trite and predictable and the characters are stereotypes. But who better to carry off the familiar role of the avaricious swindler destined to come around...read more

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SECRET OF THE INCAS looks terrific with sweeping vistas and wide expanses of Peru's Machu Picchu region. It is only when the actors begin to talk that the movie starts to lose momentum; the dialog is trite and predictable and the characters are stereotypes. But who better to carry off

the familiar role of the avaricious swindler destined to come around and prove he's not such a bad guy after all than Heston? Heston has been stone faced before, but this time he's positively granitelike. In Cuzco, he bilks tourists to come up with the funds to secure an airplane so he can fly up

to the Andes. There he believes he'll find the fabled treasure of the Incas, a jewel-laden ritual mask known as the "Sunburst." At the same time, a man of equally dubious morals, Mitchell, is also after the same relic. Farrell is a tourist, and Heston gets her to help him nab the plane. Several

groups descend on Machu Picchu at the same time. Young is after the mask for quite another reason: he hopes that its discovery might help the local natives get their heritage back. At the site, the various groups get into a fracas. To add to the complications, Maurey, a knockout who happens to be

along on the trip, falls for Heston. In the end, Heston gives the Sunburst to the natives, confesses his love for Maurey, and the two leave to spend their lives together. Heston's character change is totally implausible. He wants the mask, engages in all sorts of derring-do to get it, then throws

it aside for the love of a good woman. Sumac (who everyone at the time thought was a real South American, but who was actually one Amy Camus, a native of New York) has a remarkable five-octave singing voice and does three tunes by Moises Vivanco, "High Andes," "Virgin of the Sun God," and

"Earthquake." Fans of Robert Young should be prepared for what amounts to a cameo.

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: SECRET OF THE INCAS looks terrific with sweeping vistas and wide expanses of Peru's Machu Picchu region. It is only when the actors begin to talk that the movie starts to lose momentum; the dialog is trite and predictable and the characters are stereotypes… (more)

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