Second Skin

  • 2000
  • Movie
  • R
  • Mystery, Thriller

This piecemeal thriller, a skirmish in the ongoing battle between Natasha Henstridge and Nastassja Kinski's for the title "Queen of Bad Cinema," combines hyperactive direction with slipshod screenwriting. Disingenuous Brystal Ball (Henstridge) asks apparently shy bookstore owner Sam Kane (Angus MacFadyen) for a job, withholding her true identity. When a...read more

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Reviewed by Robert Pardi
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This piecemeal thriller, a skirmish in the ongoing battle between Natasha Henstridge and Nastassja Kinski's for the title "Queen of Bad Cinema," combines hyperactive direction with slipshod screenwriting. Disingenuous Brystal Ball (Henstridge) asks apparently shy bookstore owner Sam Kane (Angus MacFadyen) for a job, withholding her true identity. When a van knocks her down outside Kane's door, Kane takes responsibility for Crystal's recovery. Fortunately for their relationship, Crystal's head injury causes amnesia, which leads her to forget that she's a hit lady and Sam is her assignment. Crystal's memory returns in dribs and drabs and her former boyfriend, Tommy Gunn (Liam Waite), pressures her to live up to her contract with sadistic racketeer Merv Gutman (Peter Fonda). Gutman believes Sam had an affair with his wife, absconded with a fortune and altered his appearance. The cuckolded Gutman killed his faithless wife and now wants Sam to fork over the missing money. Meanwhile, Sam is being pressured by a sniveling blackmailer who threatens to reveal all about his past as a Cleveland bookie. Apparently in love with Sam, Crystal refrains from revealing all she knows to Gutman, but Gutman is determined to settle his old scores. This crime-tinged love story is confusing but not especially interesting.

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  • Released: 2000
  • Rating: R
  • Review: This piecemeal thriller, a skirmish in the ongoing battle between Natasha Henstridge and Nastassja Kinski's for the title "Queen of Bad Cinema," combines hyperactive direction with slipshod screenwriting. Disingenuous Brystal Ball (Henstridge) asks apparen… (more)

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