Second Chorus

  • 1940
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Comedy, Musical

Neither the 10 twirling toes of Fred Astaire nor the 10 twinkling fingers of Artie Shaw could breathe life into this story of a pair of trumpeters who delay the responsibilities of life by perpetually remaining college students. Danny (Astaire) and Hank (Burgess Meredith) have a love-hate relationship, but their feelings for Ellen Miller (Paulette Goddard),...read more

Where to Watch

Available to Stream

Next on TV

Rating:

Neither the 10 twirling toes of Fred Astaire nor the 10 twinkling fingers of Artie Shaw could breathe life into this story of a pair of trumpeters who delay the responsibilities of life by perpetually remaining college students. Danny (Astaire) and Hank (Burgess Meredith) have a love-hate

relationship, but their feelings for Ellen Miller (Paulette Goddard), who agrees to manage both, are much less complicated--they're both crazy about her. They vie for her affections and a spot in Artie Shaw's band, finally leave school, and knock around a little in NYC. In the end, Ellen chooses

Danny for her lawfully wedded dance partner, though in real life the outcome was quite different, with Goddard and Meredith marrying four years after the film's release. Astaire dances only three times in SECOND CHORUS; however, with the gorgeous Goddard--who ranks somewhere near the bottom of his

dance card--along for the ride, this may not be an entirely bad thing. Songs from several writers include the Oscar-nominated "Would You Like to Be the Love of My Life?" (Artie Shaw, Johnny Mercer, sung by Astaire), "Poor Mr. Chisholm" (Mercer, Bernie Hanighen, sung by Astaire), "(I Ain't Hep to

That Step) But I'll Dig It" (Mercer, Hal Borne, sung by Astaire), "Swing Concerto" (Shaw, performed by Shaw and His Orchestra), "Sweet Sue" (Will Harris, Victor Young, performed by Shaw and His Orchestra), and "I'm Yours" (E.Y. Harburg, Johnny Green).

Cast & Details See all »

  • Rating: NR
  • Review: Neither the 10 twirling toes of Fred Astaire nor the 10 twinkling fingers of Artie Shaw could breathe life into this story of a pair of trumpeters who delay the responsibilities of life by perpetually remaining college students. Danny (Astaire) and Hank (B… (more)

Show More »