Say It With Songs

  • 1929
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Musical

Trying to cash in on Jolson's success in THE JAZZ SINGER and THE SINGING FOOL, Warner Bros. was so sure of his box-office potential that it paid him $500,000, an astronomical figure in 1929, to star in this film. Little Davey Lee was even thrown in, a la "Sonny Boy." The result was a familiar story and plot that were to become a formula for Jolson. He plays...read more

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Trying to cash in on Jolson's success in THE JAZZ SINGER and THE SINGING FOOL, Warner Bros. was so sure of his box-office potential that it paid him $500,000, an astronomical figure in 1929, to star in this film. Little Davey Lee was even thrown in, a la "Sonny Boy." The result was a

familiar story and plot that were to become a formula for Jolson. He plays a radio singer who tends to neglect his wife, Nixon, and son, Lee. Despite the wandering ways of her husband, Nixon remains the devoted spouse, even when Jolson's boss and best friend makes advances toward her and promises

"big success" for her husband if she cooperates. Jolson gets wind of his friend's antics and gives him a swift hook to the jaw. The man's skull hits the pavement and he dies. Given a life sentence for manslaughter, Jolson goes to jail, leaving Nixon to become a nurse to support the family. She

also attracts the attention of surgeon Bowers. Eventually Jolson is paroled, and as he exits from the prison, Lee is hit by a car. The skilled hands of Bowers save the boy. Jolson proved to be a more polished actor than in his other two vehicles, although the formula material had become a bit

tiresome. Direction and all phases of production were top-notch; nonetheless, the film flopped, even with the great Jolson voice. Some of Jolson's songs include "Little Pals," "Why Can't You," "I'm In Seventh Heaven," "One Sweet Kiss" (Buddy De Sylva, Lew Brown, Ray Henderson, Al Jolson); "Back In

Your Own Backyard," "I'm Ka-razy About You" (Dave Dreyer, Jolson, Billy Rose).

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: Trying to cash in on Jolson's success in THE JAZZ SINGER and THE SINGING FOOL, Warner Bros. was so sure of his box-office potential that it paid him $500,000, an astronomical figure in 1929, to star in this film. Little Davey Lee was even thrown in, a la "… (more)

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