Sally, Irene And Mary

  • 1938
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Comedy, Musical

The play by Eddie Dowling and Cyrus Wood was only a suggestion for this screenplay which departed greatly from the stage musical. Faye, Davis, and Weaver do manicures at the shop owned by Parker. It's just a way station for the trio who want to make it in musical comedy. They get a chance to sing for Ratoff, a big-time investor, but that opportunity falls...read more

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The play by Eddie Dowling and Cyrus Wood was only a suggestion for this screenplay which departed greatly from the stage musical. Faye, Davis, and Weaver do manicures at the shop owned by Parker. It's just a way station for the trio who want to make it in musical comedy. They get a chance

to sing for Ratoff, a big-time investor, but that opportunity falls apart when Ratoff hassles with the girls' agent, Allen (in his second film and proving he could rattle off comedy lines in films as well as on radio). Allen feels awful about what's happened and finds them work (but not as

performers) at a Greenwich Village night club where Martin is the star singer. Allen brings in rich widow Hovick (if that name sounds familiar, it's Gypsy Rose Lee before she changed her monicker) to put up some money for a show starring Martin and the trio. Hovick sees that Martin and Faye are

getting too close (they were husband and wife in real life at the time), and since she has her chapeau set on Martin, she agrees to put up the cash if Faye is fired. When Faye gets the axe, Martin decides to quit as well. They are all out of money in a hurry, but Weaver learns that a relative has

passed away and left her a ferry in his will. It's a terrible boat that barely stays afloat, but Allen thinks it can be whipped into shape and made into a New York version of a Mississippi River show-boat for about $25,000. Meanwhile, Ratoff proposes marriage to Faye, and Hovick indicates the same

to Martin. Unbeknown to each other, Faye and Martin accept the offers with the stipulation that $25,000 be paid (sort of an O. Henry twist from "The Gift Of The Magi"). Allen and his partner, Durante, a one-time janitor, use the money to make the old boat look like a million. The floating

theater-restaurant is due to open with Martin and Faye headlining; Durante goes into the ship's innards, hits the wrong lever, and the ship takes off right in the middle of the busy Hudson. A wild chase occurs until the boat is taken back to the dock. Customers arrive, the show's a hit, and the

ship's captain, Collins, marries Martin and Faye on stage. Ratoff and Hovick have, by this time, noticed each other, and realized they've been fooled but that they will get their money back; and we are led to believe they will wind up together. Songs from a multitude of writers include: "Minuet in

Jazz" (Raymond Scott, performed by Raymond Scott Quintette), "Hot Potata" (Jimmy Durante, sung by Durante), "Help Wanted Male," (Walter Bullock, Jack Spina, sung by Davis), "Who Stole the Jam?" (Bullock, Spina, sung by Faye, Weber, Davis, the Brian Sisters), "I Could Use a Dream" (Bullock, Spina,

sung by Martin), "Sweet As a Song" (Mack Gordon, Harry Revel, sung by Martin), "This Is Where I Came In," "Half Moon on the Hudson" (Bullock, Spina), "Got My Mind on Music" (Gordon, Revel, sung by Faye).

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: The play by Eddie Dowling and Cyrus Wood was only a suggestion for this screenplay which departed greatly from the stage musical. Faye, Davis, and Weaver do manicures at the shop owned by Parker. It's just a way station for the trio who want to make it in… (more)

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