Rush Hour 2

This dispiriting rehash of RUSH HOUR, an unexpectedly successful buddy-cop comedy that traded on the contrast between Tucker's brash hipster stylings and Chan's buttoned-down fish-out-of-water routine, should please undiscriminating fans. But it in no way improves on the clich├ęd formula. Loudmouthed LAPD detective James Carter (Chris Tucker) is spending...read more

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Reviewed by Maitland McDonagh
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This dispiriting rehash of RUSH HOUR, an unexpectedly successful buddy-cop comedy that traded on the contrast between Tucker's brash hipster stylings and Chan's buttoned-down fish-out-of-water routine, should please undiscriminating fans. But it in no way improves on the clichéd formula. Loudmouthed LAPD detective James Carter (Chris Tucker) is spending his vacation in Hong Kong, lured by Detective Inspector Lee's (Jackie Chan) promise of a rollicking good time. Instead, he gets sucked into Lee's investigation of a bombing that killed two American customs agents. Lee suspects polished gangster Ricky Tan (John Lone), who was the partner of Lee's late father, a career police officer. Then Tan went over to the dark side and became a high-level smuggler; Lee suspects that Tan killed his father, which means that this time it's personal. Complicating the investigation is a sultry beauty, Isabella (Roselyn Sanchez), who may be working for the smugglers, the U.S. government or playing both sides against each other; Tan's personal hit woman, the stunning Hu Li (Ziyi Zhang); and Tan's association with American casino mogul Steve Reign (Alan King). The investigation moves from Hong Kong to Las Vegas, but Lee and Carter fall into the same odd-couple routine that so charmed moviegoers the first time out: Carter mouths off and generally acts like an obnoxious asshole (the karaoke sequence, which finds him performing Michael Jackson's "Don't Stop Till You've Had Enough" at a yakuza bar, is cringe-making) while Lee demonstrates his lightning-fast martial arts moves and serves as the genial butt of Carter's jokes, many of which verge on racist. ("You guys all look alike"? Imagine an Asian actor saying that to an African-American.) The action, which culminates in an over-the-top melee at the newly opened Red Dragon casino, is spectacular but predictable; Chan's trademark moves are as smooth as ever, a remarkable achievement give that he's nearly 50. And not to nit-pick, but Lone is only two years older than Chan, which makes it a little hard to accept him as Chan's father's partner.

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  • Released: 2001
  • Rating: PG-13
  • Review: This dispiriting rehash of RUSH HOUR, an unexpectedly successful buddy-cop comedy that traded on the contrast between Tucker's brash hipster stylings and Chan's buttoned-down fish-out-of-water routine, should please undiscriminating fans. But it in no way… (more)

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