Road Kill Usa

  • 1994
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Thriller

Originally entitled ROAD-KILL (the appended USA was probably to distinguish the video release from the 1989 Canadian cult feature ROADKILL), this cheap copy of such highway-going suspense tales as KALIFORNIA and THE HITCHER gets a mild lift from a trio of good central performances by unknown actors. Josh (Andrew Porter), naive college guy thumbing a...read more

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Originally entitled ROAD-KILL (the appended USA was probably to distinguish the video release from the 1989 Canadian cult feature ROADKILL), this cheap copy of such highway-going suspense tales as KALIFORNIA and THE HITCHER gets a mild lift from a trio of good central performances by

unknown actors.

Josh (Andrew Porter), naive college guy thumbing a ride to California, is picked up by Clint (Sean Bridgers), a rawboned, soft-spoken son of a preacher man, who's traveling with his lady love, ex-whore Marla (Deanna Perry). Both are actually remorseless killers, but Clint takes a shine to young

Josh, telling Marla, "He's got the same outlaw blood that we do. He just doesn't know it yet." The pair assign Josh the duty of murdering another hitchhiker (a foul-mouthed birthday-party clown named Stupid, billed as "himself" in the credits), but he panics and bolts instead, failing the test.

Clint ties up and prepares to dispose of Josh, but one contrivance after another delays the lethal deed, until the youth manages to slay both Marla and Clint. In a lamely predictable close, the no-longer-innocent Josh is driving Clint's car; he has an evil gleam in his eye and watches for

hitchhikers.

Bridgers slightly overdoes the grinning, maniacal aspect of his deadly character, but he, Porter, and Perry constitute a surprisingly strong thespian core in a plot that's been told once, maybe twice, too often. Production values of the film (lensed entirely in and around Charlotte, North

Carolina) are resolutely low-budget, but director and co-writer Tony Elwood exhibits a deft touch with the camera and enough clever nudges--like a roadside drive-in called Joe Bob's and an unexpected homage to Fritz Lang's M--to suggest he could do very well with better source material. (Violence,sex, adult situations, profanity.)

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  • Released: 1994
  • Rating: NR
  • Review: Originally entitled ROAD-KILL (the appended USA was probably to distinguish the video release from the 1989 Canadian cult feature ROADKILL), this cheap copy of such highway-going suspense tales as KALIFORNIA and THE HITCHER gets a mild lift from a trio of… (more)

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