Ring Of Fire

  • 1961
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Adventure, Crime

A good, old-fashioned, rip-snorting adventure picture that grabs the audience immediately and doesn't let go until the exciting conclusion, when the heroes have to fight a huge forest fire. The footage of the fires was shot during two real conflagrations that took place in Oregon and California, then ingeniously cut into the picture and, with matching shots,...read more

Where to Watch

Available to Stream

  • Watch on
Rating:

A good, old-fashioned, rip-snorting adventure picture that grabs the audience immediately and doesn't let go until the exciting conclusion, when the heroes have to fight a huge forest fire. The footage of the fires was shot during two real conflagrations that took place in Oregon and

California, then ingeniously cut into the picture and, with matching shots, no one was the wiser. Taylor, Gorshin, and Johnson are three delinquents who are captured by sheriff Janssen for having robbed a gasoline station in Oregon, near a large wooded area. He's squiring them to the hoosegow when

Taylor, the female member, brings out a gun. Janssen hasn't patted her down, preferring to wait until they got to the jail where a female officer would do that. Janssen goes from captor to captive in a twinkling. They dump Janssen's car and use him as a hostage-guide to take them through the

forbidding forest to what they think will be safety. Night descends, and by this time Janssen is beginning to find Taylor interesting, so she tries to seduce him; but he resists, never forgetting that he's a lawman and they are criminals. The next day, Johnson gets drunk and wants to push Janssen

off a cliff. The two men battle and Johnson goes over the edge to his death. Since Janssen has not checked in by radio for many hours, a search-and-rescue group has been formed. When Janssen and his two remaining kidnapers come out of the woods, the other police are waiting and nab them. Gorshin

tells the cops that Janssen had his way with Taylor, who is underage. Janssen denies this vociferously, and as the verbal fireworks continue, Gorshin tosses a cigarette aside and the area goes up in flames almost immediately. The small town is threatened and soon decimated (it was Veronia,

Oregon). Before that happens, Janssen gets the frightened townspeople into a pair of railroad cars and, with Adams to help, they drive the cars over a precarious trestle that sways a couple of hundred feet above a ravine. The train stalls and the people have to get out of the cars and make their

way across the trestle by gingerly walking along the railroad ties, some of which are now beginning to smolder and burst into flames. Gorshin uses this panicky moment to make an escape attempt by climbing down the wooden structure. Just as the townspeople reach the other side, the trestle erupts

in flame and the weight of the cars causes it to collapse, with Gorshin going to his death. Some holes in the story mar the believability, but the action is fast and furious in the Stone tradition and well-edited by producer Virginia Stone (the director's wife).

Cast & Details See all »

  • Rating: NR
  • Review: A good, old-fashioned, rip-snorting adventure picture that grabs the audience immediately and doesn't let go until the exciting conclusion, when the heroes have to fight a huge forest fire. The footage of the fires was shot during two real conflagrations t… (more)

Show More »

Trending TonightSee all »