Riders Of Destiny

  • 1933
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Western

In the first of Wayne's films for Monogram, he actually plays a singing cowboy! He's an undercover government agent who is trying to find out if Taylor and sidekick Canutt are stealing water from farmers. Wayne fools Taylor into blowing up a well, thus releasing water into a dry creek bed and providing water for the valley. Wayne, whose singing possibly...read more

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In the first of Wayne's films for Monogram, he actually plays a singing cowboy! He's an undercover government agent who is trying to find out if Taylor and sidekick Canutt are stealing water from farmers. Wayne fools Taylor into blowing up a well, thus releasing water into a dry creek bed

and providing water for the valley. Wayne, whose singing possibly was dubbed by Smith Ballew, was asked by the producer to croon while shooting down the bad guys. The Duke, of course, refused this foolishness. The film's writer-director was the father of Wayne's old boyhood pal and fellow movie

cowboy Bob Steele. This film was better than many formula westerns of the day thanks to the direction, which kept it lively and well paced. Best of all, through some interesting camera angles and clever editing, Wayne and stuntman Canutt were able to create a fight scene that looked surprisingly

realistic. This was a giant step forward for B westerns, whose fights usually suffered from a stagey flatness. Despite a small budget of $10,000, RIDERS OF DESTINY looks like a high-quality production. Canutt was referred to on the set as the film's "dog heavy," a studio term for any bad guy whose

evil character is established upon kicking a dog!

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: In the first of Wayne's films for Monogram, he actually plays a singing cowboy! He's an undercover government agent who is trying to find out if Taylor and sidekick Canutt are stealing water from farmers. Wayne fools Taylor into blowing up a well, thus rel… (more)

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