Red, Hot And Blue

  • 1949
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Musical

In 1936, Cole Porter wrote a musical with the same title as this film, but the two are unrelated apart from their titles. In this, we are treated to a musical comedy-crime picture with some funny moments and an enthusiastic (as always) performance by blond bombshell Betty Hutton. She's an aspiring Broadway actress who is dating stage director Mature. When...read more

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In 1936, Cole Porter wrote a musical with the same title as this film, but the two are unrelated apart from their titles. In this, we are treated to a musical comedy-crime picture with some funny moments and an enthusiastic (as always) performance by blond bombshell Betty Hutton. She's

an aspiring Broadway actress who is dating stage director Mature. When Mature's Broadway "angel" (a gangster who has decided to put some money into shows, not unlike the real gangsters who did the same thing in the 1930s) is killed while Hutton is visiting his apartment, the actress is suspected

of the crime. Mature wonders why she was there, and the members of the slain man's gang are eager to get to the bottom of things, so they kidnap her. There's a dumb chase at the wind-up that doesn't work at all. But until then, Hutton gets a chance to belt out some songs, Demarest does a nice bit

as the show's press agent, Havoc shows her comic ability as Hutton's roomie, and, in a very rare on-screen appearance, composer Frank Loesser plays a gangster. His acting was not nearly as meritorious as his writing. All the tunes were penned by Loesser and include: "That's Loyalty," "Where Are

You Now That I Need You?" "Hamlet" (sung by Hutton), and "I Wake Up in the Morning Feeling Fine." The "Hamlet" parody is hysterically funny with Shelton as the Melancholy Dane, Daugherty as Laertes, and Abbott as the queen. The picture made money as it rode the crest of Hutton's brief rise and

fall. It was Julie Adams' second job in movies, and good comedy was contributed by Helton, Walburn, and Talman, who went on to national fame as the always-defeated DA on the "Perry Mason" TV show.

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: In 1936, Cole Porter wrote a musical with the same title as this film, but the two are unrelated apart from their titles. In this, we are treated to a musical comedy-crime picture with some funny moments and an enthusiastic (as always) performance by blond… (more)

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