Par Ou T'Es Rentre? On T'A Pas Vue Sortir

  • 1984
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Comedy

France has given the world some of cinema's greatest artists--including Jean Renoir, Abel Gance, and the great New Wave directors--and a staggering list of film masterpieces. Yet for some inexplicable reason they revere Jerry Lewis as a genius from the same mold as Charlie Chaplin. Both Cahiers du Cinema and Positif, the two leading and oft-opposed film...read more

Where to Watch

Available to Stream

  • Watch on

France has given the world some of cinema's greatest artists--including Jean Renoir, Abel Gance, and the great New Wave directors--and a staggering list of film masterpieces. Yet for some inexplicable reason they revere Jerry Lewis as a genius from the same mold as Charlie Chaplin. Both

Cahiers du Cinema and Positif, the two leading and oft-opposed film journals of France, drop any argument when it comes to singing the praises of "Le Roi du Crazy," as Lewis is affectionately known. Lewis has been enrolled as a Commander of Arts and Letters by France's cultural minister and has

been inducted into the Legion D'honneur, an exclusive academy formed by Napoleon in 1802 as an order of chivalry for those who make "outstanding services in times of war and peace." Seeing how his films were "unappreciated" (for lack of a better word) by American audiences in recent years, Lewis

made a wise career move by beginning to appear in French films. This is his second; like his American comedies SMORGASBORD (1983) and HARDLY WORKING (1981), it explores the forbidden territory of the impossibly inane. Lewis plays a private detective hired by a woman to catch her husband (Clair,

the film's director as well) in one of his dalliances out of the bonds of wedlock. Instead, Lewis and Clair become friends. When Clair gets in trouble because of larceny, the duo must flee to Tunisia where they get involved in intrigue between rival factions in the international hotbed of

fast-food chains. It doesn't take much for one to realize that a French Lewis film is no different from an American one. Among the "zany" gags include an aerobics class of portly women who cause a building to shake as they go through their routines. Clair's direction is just as incompetent as

Lewis' later work, showing no talent for comedy. As if that weren't enough, the Frenchman takes every chance he can get to top Lewis in mugging and pratfalls. Lewis himself is uninspired, merely going through the motions in his performance. Some French critics have suggested that Lewis represents

something unique about the US that is beyond the comprehension of most Americans. This film makes a strong case for saying that there is something about the French that most Americans do not want to comprehend. (In French.)

Cast & Details See all »

  • Released: 1984
  • Rating: NR
  • Review: France has given the world some of cinema's greatest artists--including Jean Renoir, Abel Gance, and the great New Wave directors--and a staggering list of film masterpieces. Yet for some inexplicable reason they revere Jerry Lewis as a genius from the sam… (more)

Show More »