One More Spring

  • 1935
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Comedy

One of the most unjustly neglected films of its period and a fascinating reflection of Depression-era culture. Director Henry King has been justly praised for the recurring themes of Americana found in his work, and this fine film deserves place of pride in his oeuvre. ONE MORE SPRING is an amusing and very touching tale of a group of down-and-outers who...read more

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One of the most unjustly neglected films of its period and a fascinating reflection of Depression-era culture. Director Henry King has been justly praised for the recurring themes of Americana found in his work, and this fine film deserves place of pride in his oeuvre. ONE MORE SPRING is

an amusing and very touching tale of a group of down-and-outers who team together to help each other out. Baxter is Otkar, an antique dealer with nothing left but a bed which belonged to Napoleon. He runs into unemployed musician Morris Rosenberg (King, in the finest performance of his career and

one of the few uncaricatured portraits of a Jew in films of the post-Code period). The two roll the bed to the park and the park attendant (Ihnat) allows them to use his tool shed as a shelter. Soon thereafter, the two men run into Elizabeth (Gaynor), an aspiring actress who has just lost her job,

and invite her to stay at their shed. With the help of the kindly attendant and his wife (Darwell), the three friends manage to make it through a rough winter. When an banker (Mitchell) overwrought by the pressures of the Depression economy attempts suicide, the threesome talk him out of it,

giving him back the attitude he needs to make it in a competitive world. By the time spring finally rolls around, each character has something to look forward to with at least a modest degree of optimism.

Unlike MY MAN GODFREY and several other more acclaimed films about the Depression, ONE MORE SPRING doesn't ditch its portrait of the Depression in favor of romance and comedy entirely. That said, this film is also one of the sweetest and most entertaining films of its period. Gaynor and Baxter

team up for some very amusing and warm moments, playing off each other very well. The supporting cast, especially King, Ihnat, Darwell and Mitchell, is just as good and the result is a memorable gallery of appealing characters. The direction makes for an intimate look at a situation which never

takes itself too seriously and yet miraculously manages to be one of the most "honest" and insightful films made about the Depression.

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: One of the most unjustly neglected films of its period and a fascinating reflection of Depression-era culture. Director Henry King has been justly praised for the recurring themes of Americana found in his work, and this fine film deserves place of pride i… (more)

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