My Best Friend's Wedding

Australian director P.J. Hogan's big-budget follow-up to MURIEL'S WEDDING recycles many of the same elements, including karaoke bars, vulgar dresses and mean-spirited satirical jabs at its main characters, trapped in the glare of unattractive fluorescent lighting. And as in his first film, Hogan relies on pop kitsch to establish mood and ironic counterpoint,...read more

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Australian director P.J. Hogan's big-budget follow-up to MURIEL'S WEDDING recycles many of the same elements, including karaoke bars, vulgar dresses and mean-spirited satirical jabs at its main characters, trapped in the glare of unattractive fluorescent lighting. And as in

his first film, Hogan relies on pop kitsch to establish mood and ironic counterpoint, replacing the synthetic sounds of ABBA with Dionne Warwick warbling smooth ditties by Burt Bacharach and Hal David. As her 28th birthday approaches, perpetually noncommittal food critic Julianne (Julia Roberts)

is haunted by the deal she made with best-buddy Michael (Dermot Mulroney), who's always carried a torch for her: They vowed that if neither had married by the age of 28, he'd propose. But when the dreaded phone call comes, it's worse than she had imagined: Michael has fallen in love with someone

else. And worse still, this perfect being (Cameron Diaz) is blonde, younger, richer and more good-natured than Julianne. Though atypical in that our gal is forced to fight for her man by any means necessary, this Roberts vehicle is still a first-class showcase for her blinding smile, cascading

locks and amiably klutzy mannerisms. But its revelations are Diaz and Rupert Everett, who plays Roberts' boss: Her Kimmy, all insouciance and honest ditziness, is enough to make a frat boy's knees go weak, while he -- the exceedingly suave and witty voice of reason -- gives a modern spin to the

classic role of romantic confidant. Every time Everett walks into frame, you can't help but think how much better a movie this would be if there were only more of him in it. This amiable comedy may not be hugely sophisticated, but Hogan does manage to make his attractive leads look like complete

idiots, no mean achievement in image-obsessed Hollywood.

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  • Released: 1997
  • Rating: PG-13
  • Review: Australian director P.J. Hogan's big-budget follow-up to MURIEL'S WEDDING recycles many of the same elements, including karaoke bars, vulgar dresses and mean-spirited satirical jabs at its main characters, trapped in the glare of unattractive fluorescent l… (more)

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