Man Of Conquest

  • 1939
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Biography, Western

Republic Studios was never known as a substantial movie-making organization. Its rag-tag sound stages and skimpy back lot offered little to viewers other than a seemingly endless stream of B westerns. But on occasion Republic put forth a film of some importance, and this is one of them, made significant by Dix's powerful performance as frontier fighter...read more

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Republic Studios was never known as a substantial movie-making organization. Its rag-tag sound stages and skimpy back lot offered little to viewers other than a seemingly endless stream of B westerns. But on occasion Republic put forth a film of some importance, and this is one of them,

made significant by Dix's powerful performance as frontier fighter Sam Houston who, more than anyone, brought Texas into existence as a sovereign entity and later as a state of the union. The film faithfully follows this man of destiny through his greatest days, beginning in Tennessee (where

Ellis, playing Andrew Jackson, teaches him the ways of clever politics), and shows how he twice became governor of the state, touching upon his first marriage as well. Dix then travels to Arkansas, where he is adopted by the Cherokees and marries a second time. The last part of this stirring film,

directed with great energy by Nicholls, details Dix's involvement with the Texans' fight for freedom against Mexico and the brief battle scenes here (of the Alamo and San Jacinto) are outstanding. Dix is terrific as Houston, playing the great man with few histrionics and considerable restraint.

His first wife is played by Fontaine and she registers weakly, while Patrick, as the second wife, is more believable. Ellis is very good as Old Hickory. Gordon plays a wicked Santa Ana, while the men at the Alamo--Barrat, Jory, Armstrong--are well essayed. The production values are startlingly

good and the film Oscar nominations for Best Interior Decoration, Best Sound, and Best Original Score.

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: Republic Studios was never known as a substantial movie-making organization. Its rag-tag sound stages and skimpy back lot offered little to viewers other than a seemingly endless stream of B westerns. But on occasion Republic put forth a film of some impor… (more)

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