Man About Town

  • 1939
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Comedy, Musical

This is not one of Jack Benny's best, but there's enough good fun and enough belly laughs to satisfy all but the most finicky. Benny is a Broadway producer on a trip to London. He yearns for love with singer Lamour, but she finds him a bore with no sex appeal. In order to make her jealous, he begins to flirt with Barnes. Barnes and Jeans have husbands,...read more

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This is not one of Jack Benny's best, but there's enough good fun and enough belly laughs to satisfy all but the most finicky. Benny is a Broadway producer on a trip to London. He yearns for love with singer Lamour, but she finds him a bore with no sex appeal. In order to make her

jealous, he begins to flirt with Barnes. Barnes and Jeans have husbands, Arnold and Woolley, respectively, who are not paying enough attention to them, so the women use Benny to arouse their spouses' ire and jealousy. The two men go after Benny but he is saved by the intervention of Anderson, his

long-suffering valet. In the end, Lamour falls for Benny and the picture concludes. It's the kind of movie that you watch, laugh at, and don't recall the next day. Betty Grable was to have the Lamour role but she had to have an emergency appendectomy, although she returned before the end of

shooting to do one of the musical numbers. The undistinguished songs include: "Strange Enchantment" (Frank Loesser, Frederick Hollander, sung by Dorothy Lamour), "Bluebirds in the Moonlight" (Ralph Rainger, Leo Robin), "Fidgety Joe" (Loesser, Matty Malneck, sung by Betty Grable), and "That

Sentimental Sandwich" (Loesser, Hollander, sung by Lamour and Phil Harris). Benny tapped Harris and Anderson from his popular radio show but is not in his usual persona of the penny-pinching, epicene radio star. The very best scenes are between Anderson and Benny, who had developed their timing to

such a fine edge that there was never a dull moment when they were on screen in any movie. Several variety bits include the Merriel Abbott Dancers and as neat a group of pulchritudinous Petty Girls as anyone will ever lay eyes upon. Benny was one of the country's top radio stars and audiences who

had been listening to him for years couldn't get enough of him on screen. He, Bob Hope, and George Burns probably lasted longer than any other comedians in show business. Hope is funny when he gets good material from his army of writers, and Burns is the ultimate straight man, but Benny was funny

without saying a word or moving a muscle. Now that's funny.

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: This is not one of Jack Benny's best, but there's enough good fun and enough belly laughs to satisfy all but the most finicky. Benny is a Broadway producer on a trip to London. He yearns for love with singer Lamour, but she finds him a bore with no sex app… (more)

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