Magnificent Doll

  • 1946
  • Movie
  • NR
  • Biography

Dolly Madison's real life was fascinating. She helped the United States in the War of 1812 when she stole some important documents from the British. She had affairs and she was the woman behind one of our early presidents. Unfortunately, for history and for moviegoers, very little of that is seen in this boring film that bears as much resemblance to the...read more

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Dolly Madison's real life was fascinating. She helped the United States in the War of 1812 when she stole some important documents from the British. She had affairs and she was the woman behind one of our early presidents. Unfortunately, for history and for moviegoers, very little of that

is seen in this boring film that bears as much resemblance to the truth as BLAZING SADDLES does to a western. Rogers loses her first husband, Quaker McNally, then opens a boarding house with her mother, Wood, in the Washington area. She is soon wooed by scoundrel Niven, (as Aaron Burr), and quiet

Meredith (as Madison), a philosopher at heart, and not a man to seek high office. She has an affair with Niven, who later would kill Space (as Alexander Hamilton), but marries Meredith and pushes him to the top of the political ladder when he becomes secretary of state to Rhodes (as Jefferson) and

is just waiting in the wings to become president. Lavish production values are marred by Stone's dull screenplay. Rogers, Meredith, and Niven do what they can but are ultimately defeated by the words and the lethargic pace of Borzage's direction. The true story of this unusual woman has yet to be

told. Famed milliner Lily Dache did the hats, most of which were more interesting than the dialog.

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  • Rating: NR
  • Review: Dolly Madison's real life was fascinating. She helped the United States in the War of 1812 when she stole some important documents from the British. She had affairs and she was the woman behind one of our early presidents. Unfortunately, for history and fo… (more)

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